Improved redispersibility of cellulose nanofibrils in water using maltodextrin as a green, easily removable and non-toxic additive

Improved redispersibility of cellulose nanofibrils in water using maltodextrin as a green, easily... The irreversible aggregation of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) during their dehydration or hornification, increases their commercialization costs, restricting their storage and transportation to cellulosic suspensions. This issue has prompted the development of different alternatives in literature; some of them require energy intensive treatments for their redispersion or the use of additives which are not convenient for food or pharmaceutical related applications. To overcome these problems, the present work evaluates the use of maltodextrin (MDX) as a capping agent to avoid CNFs hornification. Different nanocellulose to MDX (N:M) ratios were evaluated. The physico-chemical, morphological and rheological properties of ensuing samples were analyzed. Infrared spectroscopy and thermal analyses indicate a complete removal of MDX after cellulose isolation. A suspension stability comparable to the never-dried product was achieved when using a N:M ratio beyond 1:1.5, and it was maintained up to a ratio of 1:2.5. Morphological and rheological data agree with these results. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Hydrocolloids Elsevier

Improved redispersibility of cellulose nanofibrils in water using maltodextrin as a green, easily removable and non-toxic additive

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0268-005X
eISSN
1873-7137
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.foodhyd.2017.12.024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The irreversible aggregation of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) during their dehydration or hornification, increases their commercialization costs, restricting their storage and transportation to cellulosic suspensions. This issue has prompted the development of different alternatives in literature; some of them require energy intensive treatments for their redispersion or the use of additives which are not convenient for food or pharmaceutical related applications. To overcome these problems, the present work evaluates the use of maltodextrin (MDX) as a capping agent to avoid CNFs hornification. Different nanocellulose to MDX (N:M) ratios were evaluated. The physico-chemical, morphological and rheological properties of ensuing samples were analyzed. Infrared spectroscopy and thermal analyses indicate a complete removal of MDX after cellulose isolation. A suspension stability comparable to the never-dried product was achieved when using a N:M ratio beyond 1:1.5, and it was maintained up to a ratio of 1:2.5. Morphological and rheological data agree with these results.

Journal

Food HydrocolloidsElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

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