Implications of coordinated cell-body rotations for Leptospira motility

Implications of coordinated cell-body rotations for Leptospira motility The spirochete Leptospira has a coiled cell body and two periplasmic flagella (PFs) that reside beneath the outer sheath. PFs extend from each end of the cell body and are attached to the right-handed spiral protoplasmic cylinder (PC) via a connection with the flagellar motor embedded in the inner membrane. PFs bend each end of the cell body into left-handed spiral (S) or planar hook (H) shapes, allowing leptospiral cells to swim using combined anterior S-end and posterior H-end gyrations with PC rotations. As a plausible mechanism for motility, S- and H-end gyrations by PFs and PC rotations by PF countertorque imply mutual influences among the three parts. Here we show a correlation between H-end gyration and PC rotation from the time records of rotation rates and rotational directions of individual swimming cells. We then qualitatively explain the observed correlation using a simple rotation model based on the measurements of motility and intracellular arrangements of PFs revealed by cryo-electron microscopy and electron cryotomography. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications Elsevier

Implications of coordinated cell-body rotations for Leptospira motility

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/implications-of-coordinated-cell-body-rotations-for-leptospira-jxrA5OGEER
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0006-291x
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.bbrc.2017.08.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The spirochete Leptospira has a coiled cell body and two periplasmic flagella (PFs) that reside beneath the outer sheath. PFs extend from each end of the cell body and are attached to the right-handed spiral protoplasmic cylinder (PC) via a connection with the flagellar motor embedded in the inner membrane. PFs bend each end of the cell body into left-handed spiral (S) or planar hook (H) shapes, allowing leptospiral cells to swim using combined anterior S-end and posterior H-end gyrations with PC rotations. As a plausible mechanism for motility, S- and H-end gyrations by PFs and PC rotations by PF countertorque imply mutual influences among the three parts. Here we show a correlation between H-end gyration and PC rotation from the time records of rotation rates and rotational directions of individual swimming cells. We then qualitatively explain the observed correlation using a simple rotation model based on the measurements of motility and intracellular arrangements of PFs revealed by cryo-electron microscopy and electron cryotomography.

Journal

Biochemical and Biophysical Research CommunicationsElsevier

Published: Sep 30, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off