Impacts of scatter-hoarding rodents on restoration of oil tea Camellia oleifera in a fragmented forest

Impacts of scatter-hoarding rodents on restoration of oil tea Camellia oleifera in a fragmented... Few studies have evaluated the role of seed dispersal by animals (especially scatter-hoarding rodents) in natural restoration in fragmented forests. In order to assess the potential benefits of oil tea from natural dispersal by seed-caching rodents, we tracked the individual seeds with coded tin tags of oil tea Camellia oleifera (Theaceae), an economically important evergreen shrubs, by establishing artificial seed sources (mimicking natural seed rain) in a secondary stand (i.e. Camellia -poor stand, where no oil tea shrubs grow) in a fragmented forest in the Dujiangyan Region of Sichuan Province, China. Our results indicate that the total survival of the released seeds was zero, which confirms the hypothesis that poor seeding regeneration may be caused by poor seed sources and subsequent high rodent predation in fragmented secondary forests. As small rodents repeatedly handled the tagged seeds, the proportions of seed consumption (i.e. eaten) and removal were constant in both Dispersal I and Dispersal II, but the caching proportion significantly decreased and the missing proportion significantly increased. Our results also indicate that seed-caching rodents are important in promoting natural regeneration of oil tea through scatter-hoarding seeds in soil: (1) seed removal was high (91.2%); (2) many removed seeds were found to be cached (48.2% for the relocated seeds); (3) dispersal distances of the cached seeds ranged from 0 to 38 m (mean, 7.9 m); (4) 81.3% of the caches (including primary and secondary caches) contained only one seed. Therefore, seed-caching rodents could have the potential to help restore natural populations of oil tea if we increase oil tea seed sources in the Camellia -poor stands. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forest Ecology and Management Elsevier

Impacts of scatter-hoarding rodents on restoration of oil tea Camellia oleifera in a fragmented forest

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/impacts-of-scatter-hoarding-rodents-on-restoration-of-oil-tea-camellia-34knJU4jgp
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0378-1127
eISSN
1872-7042
DOI
10.1016/j.foreco.2004.04.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Few studies have evaluated the role of seed dispersal by animals (especially scatter-hoarding rodents) in natural restoration in fragmented forests. In order to assess the potential benefits of oil tea from natural dispersal by seed-caching rodents, we tracked the individual seeds with coded tin tags of oil tea Camellia oleifera (Theaceae), an economically important evergreen shrubs, by establishing artificial seed sources (mimicking natural seed rain) in a secondary stand (i.e. Camellia -poor stand, where no oil tea shrubs grow) in a fragmented forest in the Dujiangyan Region of Sichuan Province, China. Our results indicate that the total survival of the released seeds was zero, which confirms the hypothesis that poor seeding regeneration may be caused by poor seed sources and subsequent high rodent predation in fragmented secondary forests. As small rodents repeatedly handled the tagged seeds, the proportions of seed consumption (i.e. eaten) and removal were constant in both Dispersal I and Dispersal II, but the caching proportion significantly decreased and the missing proportion significantly increased. Our results also indicate that seed-caching rodents are important in promoting natural regeneration of oil tea through scatter-hoarding seeds in soil: (1) seed removal was high (91.2%); (2) many removed seeds were found to be cached (48.2% for the relocated seeds); (3) dispersal distances of the cached seeds ranged from 0 to 38 m (mean, 7.9 m); (4) 81.3% of the caches (including primary and secondary caches) contained only one seed. Therefore, seed-caching rodents could have the potential to help restore natural populations of oil tea if we increase oil tea seed sources in the Camellia -poor stands.

Journal

Forest Ecology and ManagementElsevier

Published: Jul 26, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off