Impacts and managerial implications for sewer systems due to recent changes to inputs in domestic wastewater – A review

Impacts and managerial implications for sewer systems due to recent changes to inputs in domestic... Ever since the advent of major sewer construction in the 1850s, the issue of increased solids deposition in sewers due to changes in domestic wastewater inputs has been frequently debated. Three recent changes considered here are the introduction of kitchen sink food waste disposers (FWDs); rising levels of inputs of fat, oil and grease (FOG); and the installation of low-flush toilets (LFTs). In this review these changes have been examined with regard to potential solids depositional impacts on sewer systems and the managerial implications. The review indicates that each of the changes has the potential to cause an increase in solids deposition in sewers and this is likely to be more pronounced for the upstream reaches of networks that serve fewer households than the downstream parts and for specific sewer features such as sags. The review has highlighted the importance of educational campaigns directed to the public to mitigate deposition as many of the observed problems have been linked to domestic behaviour in regard to FOGs, FWDs and toilet flushing. A standardized monitoring procedure of repeat sewer blockage locations can also be a means to identify depositional hot-spots. Interactions between the various changes in inputs in the studies reviewed here indicated an increased potential for blockage formation, but this would need to be further substantiated. As the precise nature of these changes in inputs have been found to be variable, depending on lifestyles and type of installation, the additional problems that may arise pose particular challenges to sewer operators and managers because of the difficulty in generalizing the nature of the changes, particularly where retrofitting projects in households are being considered. The three types of changes to inputs reviewed here highlight the need to consider whether or not more or less solid waste from households should be diverted into sewers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Environmental Management Elsevier

Impacts and managerial implications for sewer systems due to recent changes to inputs in domestic wastewater – A review

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/impacts-and-managerial-implications-for-sewer-systems-due-to-recent-0wnw6qNZ8c
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-4797
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jenvman.2015.06.043
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ever since the advent of major sewer construction in the 1850s, the issue of increased solids deposition in sewers due to changes in domestic wastewater inputs has been frequently debated. Three recent changes considered here are the introduction of kitchen sink food waste disposers (FWDs); rising levels of inputs of fat, oil and grease (FOG); and the installation of low-flush toilets (LFTs). In this review these changes have been examined with regard to potential solids depositional impacts on sewer systems and the managerial implications. The review indicates that each of the changes has the potential to cause an increase in solids deposition in sewers and this is likely to be more pronounced for the upstream reaches of networks that serve fewer households than the downstream parts and for specific sewer features such as sags. The review has highlighted the importance of educational campaigns directed to the public to mitigate deposition as many of the observed problems have been linked to domestic behaviour in regard to FOGs, FWDs and toilet flushing. A standardized monitoring procedure of repeat sewer blockage locations can also be a means to identify depositional hot-spots. Interactions between the various changes in inputs in the studies reviewed here indicated an increased potential for blockage formation, but this would need to be further substantiated. As the precise nature of these changes in inputs have been found to be variable, depending on lifestyles and type of installation, the additional problems that may arise pose particular challenges to sewer operators and managers because of the difficulty in generalizing the nature of the changes, particularly where retrofitting projects in households are being considered. The three types of changes to inputs reviewed here highlight the need to consider whether or not more or less solid waste from households should be diverted into sewers.

Journal

Journal of Environmental ManagementElsevier

Published: Sep 15, 2015

References

  • Economic and environmental analysis of standard, high efficiency, rainwater flushed, and composting toilets
    Anand, C.; Apul, D.S.
  • Application of food waste disposers and alternate cycles process in small-decentralized towns: a case study
    Battistoni, P.; Fatone, F.; Passacantando, D.; Bolzonella, D.
  • Door-stepping as a strategy for improved food waste recycling behaviour–Evaluation of a full-scale experiment
    Bernstad, A.; la Cour Jansen, J.; Aspegren, A.
  • Degradation and modification of fats, oils and grease by commercial microbial supplements
    Brooksbank, A.M.; Latchford, J.W.; Mudge, S.M.
  • Sediments in sewers
    Crabtree, R.
  • Slope profile measurement of sewer inverts
    Dirksen, J.; Pothof, I.; Langeveld, J.; Clemens, F.
  • Additional pollutants and deposition potential from garbage disposers
    Galil, N.; Shpiner, R.
  • Mechanisms of Fat, Oil and Grease (FOG) deposit formation in sewer lines
    He, X.; de los Reyes, F.L.; Leming, M.L.; Dean, L.O.; Lappi, S.E.; Ducoste, J.J.
  • Factors that influence properties of FOG deposits and their formation in sewer collection systems
    Iasmin, M.; Dean, L.O.; Lappi, S.E.; Ducoste, J.J.
  • Better water resources through sewerless sanitation
    Leich, H.H.
  • Greywater use in Israel and worldwide: standards and prospects
    Oron, G.; Adel, M.; Agmon, V.; Friedler, E.; Halperin, R.; Leshem, E.; Weinberg, D.
  • Modelling the impacts of domestic water conservation on the sustainability of the urban sewerage system
    Parkinson, J.; Schütze, M.; Butler, D.
  • Modelling the effects of on-site greywater reuse and low flush toilets on municipal sewer systems
    Penn, R.; Schütze, M.; Friedler, E.
  • A database and model to support proactive management of sediment-related sewer blockages
    Rodríguez, J.P.; McIntyre, N.; Díaz-Granados, M.; Maksimović, Č.
  • Fat, oil and grease deposits in sewers: characterisation of deposits and formation mechanisms
    Williams, J.B.; Clarkson, C.; Mant, C.; Drinkwater, A.; May, E.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off