Impact of environmental chemicals on the thyroid hormone function in pituitary rat GH3 cells

Impact of environmental chemicals on the thyroid hormone function in pituitary rat GH3 cells Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are widespread in the environment and suspected to interfere with the function of thyroid hormones (THs). We investigated the TH disrupting activity of different classes of EDCs including plasticizers (bisphenol A, bisphenol A dimethacrylate), alkylphenols (4- n -nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol), pesticides (prochloraz, iprodion, chlorpyrifos), PCB metabolites (OH-PCB 106, OH-PCB 121, OH-PCB 69) and brominated flame-retardants (tetrabromobisphenol A). The ED potential of a chemical was determined by its effect on the cell proliferation of TH-dependent rat pituitary GH3 cell line. All tested chemicals significantly interfered with the cell proliferation alone or upon co-treatment with T3. The growth of GH3 cells was stimulated by all tested chemicals, but 4- n -nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol, prochloraz and iprodion elicited an inhibitory effect on cell growth. In conclusion, these EDCs have the potential to exert TH disruption increasing the risk or a negative impact on fetal brain development, resulting in cognitive dysfunctions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology Elsevier

Impact of environmental chemicals on the thyroid hormone function in pituitary rat GH3 cells

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Abstract

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are widespread in the environment and suspected to interfere with the function of thyroid hormones (THs). We investigated the TH disrupting activity of different classes of EDCs including plasticizers (bisphenol A, bisphenol A dimethacrylate), alkylphenols (4- n -nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol), pesticides (prochloraz, iprodion, chlorpyrifos), PCB metabolites (OH-PCB 106, OH-PCB 121, OH-PCB 69) and brominated flame-retardants (tetrabromobisphenol A). The ED potential of a chemical was determined by its effect on the cell proliferation of TH-dependent rat pituitary GH3 cell line. All tested chemicals significantly interfered with the cell proliferation alone or upon co-treatment with T3. The growth of GH3 cells was stimulated by all tested chemicals, but 4- n -nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol, prochloraz and iprodion elicited an inhibitory effect on cell growth. In conclusion, these EDCs have the potential to exert TH disruption increasing the risk or a negative impact on fetal brain development, resulting in cognitive dysfunctions.

Journal

Molecular and Cellular EndocrinologyElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2005

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