Identification of fish species using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)

Identification of fish species using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was investigated as a potential fish species identification method. One hundred and sixteen specimens from eight species of fish were analysed. The eight species tested were barramundi, Nile perch, john dory, mirror dory, silver dory, spikey oreo, warty oreo and smooth oreo. The predominant species tested was barramundi; 80 specimens of this species were analysed. Of these samples, 42 had been individually verified by independent sources. The RAPD profiles generated were consistent within this group. The remaining samples were retail purchased and consisted of 24 imports and eight local whole small barramundi and six fillets. All of the whole barramundi, including the imported fish, generated profiles which agreed with the verified samples. Four of the six fillets purchased did not match the typical barramundi profile, three profiles, however, were consistent with those generated for Nile perch. Species-specific profiles were also generated for the other seven species analysed by RAPD. One john dory, from five fillets tested, did not comply with the six authenticated samples. All of the RAPD profiles were resolved by agarose gel electrophoresis. Forty nine RAPD profiles including those that did not match were also confirmed by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) on a DNA sequencer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular and Cellular Probes Elsevier

Identification of fish species using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/identification-of-fish-species-using-random-amplified-polymorphic-dna-KjbEjzsBh6
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0890-8508
D.O.I.
10.1006/mcpr.1996.0060
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was investigated as a potential fish species identification method. One hundred and sixteen specimens from eight species of fish were analysed. The eight species tested were barramundi, Nile perch, john dory, mirror dory, silver dory, spikey oreo, warty oreo and smooth oreo. The predominant species tested was barramundi; 80 specimens of this species were analysed. Of these samples, 42 had been individually verified by independent sources. The RAPD profiles generated were consistent within this group. The remaining samples were retail purchased and consisted of 24 imports and eight local whole small barramundi and six fillets. All of the whole barramundi, including the imported fish, generated profiles which agreed with the verified samples. Four of the six fillets purchased did not match the typical barramundi profile, three profiles, however, were consistent with those generated for Nile perch. Species-specific profiles were also generated for the other seven species analysed by RAPD. One john dory, from five fillets tested, did not comply with the six authenticated samples. All of the RAPD profiles were resolved by agarose gel electrophoresis. Forty nine RAPD profiles including those that did not match were also confirmed by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) on a DNA sequencer.

Journal

Molecular and Cellular ProbesElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 1996

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off