Identification of biphenyl 2, 3-dioxygenase and its catabolic role for phenazine degradation in Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1

Identification of biphenyl 2, 3-dioxygenase and its catabolic role for phenazine degradation in... Phenazines are important nitrogen-containing secondary metabolites that display a range of biological functionalities. However, these compounds have shown lethal effects on humans and, the fate of phenazine in the ecosystem remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated that Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1 could utilize phenazine as a sole carbon source for growth. Intermediate produced during phenazine degradation was purified and identified as 1, 2-dihydrogen 1, 2-dihydroxy phenazine. Biphenyl 2, 3-dioxygenase was determined to be the initial dioxygenase for phenazine degradation through gene cloning and whole cell transformation techniques. Phenazine was converted to 1, 2-dihydrogen 1, 2-dihydroxy phenazine through hydrogenation and hydroxylation, which then transformed to 2-hydroxy phenazine through spontaneous dehydration. ThebphA1fA2f, were evidenced to be the only genes encoding the initial dioxygenase for phenazine degradation. BphB (dihydrodiol dehydrogenase) and BphC (2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase) did not exhibit any 1, 2-dihydrogen 1, 2-dihydroxy phenazine and 1, 2-dihydroxy phenazine degradation capability, suggesting no contribution in phenazine degradation. Phylogenetic analysis of the dioxygenases demonstrated enormous biodegradation potential in strain B1. In conclusion, this study opens up new possibilities in better understanding the phenazine degradation in the environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Environmental Management Elsevier

Identification of biphenyl 2, 3-dioxygenase and its catabolic role for phenazine degradation in Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/identification-of-biphenyl-2-3-dioxygenase-and-its-catabolic-role-for-3bPYq6Jrl5
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-4797
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.09.027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Phenazines are important nitrogen-containing secondary metabolites that display a range of biological functionalities. However, these compounds have shown lethal effects on humans and, the fate of phenazine in the ecosystem remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated that Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1 could utilize phenazine as a sole carbon source for growth. Intermediate produced during phenazine degradation was purified and identified as 1, 2-dihydrogen 1, 2-dihydroxy phenazine. Biphenyl 2, 3-dioxygenase was determined to be the initial dioxygenase for phenazine degradation through gene cloning and whole cell transformation techniques. Phenazine was converted to 1, 2-dihydrogen 1, 2-dihydroxy phenazine through hydrogenation and hydroxylation, which then transformed to 2-hydroxy phenazine through spontaneous dehydration. ThebphA1fA2f, were evidenced to be the only genes encoding the initial dioxygenase for phenazine degradation. BphB (dihydrodiol dehydrogenase) and BphC (2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase) did not exhibit any 1, 2-dihydrogen 1, 2-dihydroxy phenazine and 1, 2-dihydroxy phenazine degradation capability, suggesting no contribution in phenazine degradation. Phylogenetic analysis of the dioxygenases demonstrated enormous biodegradation potential in strain B1. In conclusion, this study opens up new possibilities in better understanding the phenazine degradation in the environment.

Journal

Journal of Environmental ManagementElsevier

Published: Dec 15, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off