Hydrogen-dependent denitrification in a two-reactor bio-electrochemical system

Hydrogen-dependent denitrification in a two-reactor bio-electrochemical system An autotrophic biological process was developed for the treatment of nitrate-contaminated drinking water. The system comprised of two steps: the water to be treated was first enriched with hydrogen (energy source) in the cathodic chamber of an electrochemical cell, and then denitrified in the bioreactor. The bioreactor was a packed bed of granulated activated carbon, and the water flow was directed in an upward continuous mode. The system was operated for one year, at various water velocities and current intensities. Denitrification rates up to 0.25 kg N m −3 d −1 were obtained at the hydraulic residence time of 1 h. The system was stable. When detected in the effluent, the concentration of nitrite was low, even under conditions that resulted in the elution of very high concentrations of nitrate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Research Elsevier

Hydrogen-dependent denitrification in a two-reactor bio-electrochemical system

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0043-1354
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0043-1354(00)00300-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An autotrophic biological process was developed for the treatment of nitrate-contaminated drinking water. The system comprised of two steps: the water to be treated was first enriched with hydrogen (energy source) in the cathodic chamber of an electrochemical cell, and then denitrified in the bioreactor. The bioreactor was a packed bed of granulated activated carbon, and the water flow was directed in an upward continuous mode. The system was operated for one year, at various water velocities and current intensities. Denitrification rates up to 0.25 kg N m −3 d −1 were obtained at the hydraulic residence time of 1 h. The system was stable. When detected in the effluent, the concentration of nitrite was low, even under conditions that resulted in the elution of very high concentrations of nitrate.

Journal

Water ResearchElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2001

References

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