Hydrodynamic lubrication of textured steel surfaces under reciprocating sliding conditions

Hydrodynamic lubrication of textured steel surfaces under reciprocating sliding conditions The influence of surface topography on lubricant film thickness has been investigated for the reciprocating sliding of patterned plane steel surfaces against cylindrical counterbodies under conditions of hydrodynamic lubrication. Patterns of circular depressions, grooves and chevrons were used, and the fractional area coverage, depth, width and sliding orientation relative to the texture were systematically varied. Textured samples with features much larger than the elastic contact width gave film thicknesses, which were smaller than those for non-textured samples. This effect was more significant for larger features. For patterns composed of circular pockets, maximum film thickness was achieved for an area coverage fraction f ≈0.11. Chevron patterns pointing along the sliding direction gave higher film thicknesses than those pointing across. For an area coverage ratio of ca. 0.06, maximum film thickness was achieved for a feature depth to width ratio of about 0.07. Among the patterns investigated, chevrons were the most effective and grooves the least effective in increasing hydrodynamic film thickness. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tribology International Elsevier

Hydrodynamic lubrication of textured steel surfaces under reciprocating sliding conditions

Tribology International, Volume 40 (8) – Aug 1, 2007

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-679X
eISSN
1879-2464
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.triboint.2007.01.014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The influence of surface topography on lubricant film thickness has been investigated for the reciprocating sliding of patterned plane steel surfaces against cylindrical counterbodies under conditions of hydrodynamic lubrication. Patterns of circular depressions, grooves and chevrons were used, and the fractional area coverage, depth, width and sliding orientation relative to the texture were systematically varied. Textured samples with features much larger than the elastic contact width gave film thicknesses, which were smaller than those for non-textured samples. This effect was more significant for larger features. For patterns composed of circular pockets, maximum film thickness was achieved for an area coverage fraction f ≈0.11. Chevron patterns pointing along the sliding direction gave higher film thicknesses than those pointing across. For an area coverage ratio of ca. 0.06, maximum film thickness was achieved for a feature depth to width ratio of about 0.07. Among the patterns investigated, chevrons were the most effective and grooves the least effective in increasing hydrodynamic film thickness.

Journal

Tribology InternationalElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2007

References

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