How emotions mediate the effects of perceived justice on loyalty in service recovery situations: an empirical study

How emotions mediate the effects of perceived justice on loyalty in service recovery situations:... The present study focuses on the following question: How positive and negative emotions mediate the effects of justice on loyalty in an actual service recovery situation related to retail banking? The specific effects of the three dimensions of justice (distributive, interactional and procedural) on the actual loyalty–exit of customers were shown to be quite different from each other. Interactional justice (e.g., courtesy) plays a predominant role, since it impacts both positive and negative emotions and the exit–loyalty behavior. Distributive justice (e.g., compensation offered to the complaining customers) affects the behavior through the symmetrical mediating effects of negative and positive emotions. Procedural justice (i.e., timeliness), which has asymmetric effects on emotions and behavior, plays the role of a “basic requirement”. These results are interpreted in terms of Justice Theory and Affect Control Theory (ACT) and in terms of managerial implications for services organizations, such as employees' training and complaints' handling. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Business Research Elsevier

How emotions mediate the effects of perceived justice on loyalty in service recovery situations: an empirical study

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0148-2963
eISSN
1873-7978
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jbusres.2003.09.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study focuses on the following question: How positive and negative emotions mediate the effects of justice on loyalty in an actual service recovery situation related to retail banking? The specific effects of the three dimensions of justice (distributive, interactional and procedural) on the actual loyalty–exit of customers were shown to be quite different from each other. Interactional justice (e.g., courtesy) plays a predominant role, since it impacts both positive and negative emotions and the exit–loyalty behavior. Distributive justice (e.g., compensation offered to the complaining customers) affects the behavior through the symmetrical mediating effects of negative and positive emotions. Procedural justice (i.e., timeliness), which has asymmetric effects on emotions and behavior, plays the role of a “basic requirement”. These results are interpreted in terms of Justice Theory and Affect Control Theory (ACT) and in terms of managerial implications for services organizations, such as employees' training and complaints' handling.

Journal

Journal of Business ResearchElsevier

Published: May 1, 2005

References

  • HRM and service fairness: how being fair with employees spills over to customers
    Bowen, D.E.; Gilliland, S.W.; Folger, R.
  • Complaint behavior of Mexican–American consumers to a third-party agency
    Cornwell, T.B.; Bligh, A.D.
  • Equity, equality, and need: what determines which value will be used as the basis for distributive justice?
    Deutsch, M.
  • Verbal communication between complaining consumers and company service representatives
    Garrett, D.E.; Meyers, R.A.
  • Racial differences in children's responses to inequity
    Gray-Little, B.; Teddlie, C.B.
  • Usefulness of economics in explaining consumer complaints
    Kolodinsky, J.
  • The effect of customers' emotional responses to service failures on their recovery effort evaluations and satisfaction judgments
    Smith, A.K.; Bolton, R.N.
  • An exploration of customer exit in retail banking
    Stewart, K.
  • The role of affective states and locus of attribution in evaluations of service
    Taylor, S.

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