How descriptive food names bias sensory perceptions in restaurants

How descriptive food names bias sensory perceptions in restaurants Can a dietitian, restaurateur, marketer, or parent change the perceived taste of a food simply by changing its name? In a six-week cafeteria experiment involving 140 customers, those who ate foods with evocative, descriptive menu names (such as “Succulent Italian Seafood Filet”) generated a larger number of positive comments about the food and rated it as more appealing, tasty, and caloric than those eating regularly-named counterparts (e.g., “Seafood Filet”). The open-ended comments indicated that their evaluations were assimilated with prior taste expectations in a manner that is more deliberate and less automatic than most research typically claims. For practioners, the use of descriptive names may help improve perceptions of foods in institutional settings, and it may help facilitate the introduction of unfamiliar foods. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Quality and Preference Elsevier

How descriptive food names bias sensory perceptions in restaurants

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0950-3293
DOI
10.1016/j.foodqual.2004.06.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Can a dietitian, restaurateur, marketer, or parent change the perceived taste of a food simply by changing its name? In a six-week cafeteria experiment involving 140 customers, those who ate foods with evocative, descriptive menu names (such as “Succulent Italian Seafood Filet”) generated a larger number of positive comments about the food and rated it as more appealing, tasty, and caloric than those eating regularly-named counterparts (e.g., “Seafood Filet”). The open-ended comments indicated that their evaluations were assimilated with prior taste expectations in a manner that is more deliberate and less automatic than most research typically claims. For practioners, the use of descriptive names may help improve perceptions of foods in institutional settings, and it may help facilitate the introduction of unfamiliar foods.

Journal

Food Quality and PreferenceElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2005

References

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