Household welfare implications of fossil fuel subsidy reforms in developing countries

Household welfare implications of fossil fuel subsidy reforms in developing countries With over 200 countries reaching an agreement with the stated aim of restricting global warming to “well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels” – the most comprehensive climate change agreement was recently signed. Though most of the hard work lies ahead, it marks an important first step for the collective global community to address climate change. Fossil fuels continue to remain one of the largest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions and for many developing countries high levels fossil fuels continues to enable an overconsumption of fossil fuels. Given the sensitivity of governments to subsidy reforms, this study examines the household welfare implications of the removal of fossil fuel subsidies. It finds that while welfare implications are unambiguously positive for government the results are mixed for private households, although in an overwhelming majority of cases, the results are positive. However, even in the cases where the welfare implications are negative for private households we find that it is possible for governments to carry out the reforms in such a way as to be welfare improving to households incomes by compensating them with some of the fiscal savings gained from the subsidy reform. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Energy Policy Elsevier

Household welfare implications of fossil fuel subsidy reforms in developing countries

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-4215
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.enpol.2016.06.039
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

With over 200 countries reaching an agreement with the stated aim of restricting global warming to “well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels” – the most comprehensive climate change agreement was recently signed. Though most of the hard work lies ahead, it marks an important first step for the collective global community to address climate change. Fossil fuels continue to remain one of the largest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions and for many developing countries high levels fossil fuels continues to enable an overconsumption of fossil fuels. Given the sensitivity of governments to subsidy reforms, this study examines the household welfare implications of the removal of fossil fuel subsidies. It finds that while welfare implications are unambiguously positive for government the results are mixed for private households, although in an overwhelming majority of cases, the results are positive. However, even in the cases where the welfare implications are negative for private households we find that it is possible for governments to carry out the reforms in such a way as to be welfare improving to households incomes by compensating them with some of the fiscal savings gained from the subsidy reform.

Journal

Energy PolicyElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2016

References

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