Hostility in heroin abusers subtypes: Fluoxetine and naltrexone treatment

Hostility in heroin abusers subtypes: Fluoxetine and naltrexone treatment Gerra Gilberto, Giuseppe Fertonani, Amir Zaimovic, Ines Rota-Graziosi, Paola Avanzini, Rocco Caccavari, Roberto Delsignore and Alfio Lucchini: Hostility in Substance Abusers Subtypes: Fluoxetine and Naltrexone Treatment. Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. & and Biol. Psychiat. 1995, 19(8): 1225–1237. 1. 1. Substance abusers subtypes have been identified considering underlying psychobiological disorder, familial factors, age of onset, legal problems and drug of choice. 2. 2. In the present study the authors submitted 98 male heroin addicted individuals (age 19–28 y) to the Buss Durkee Hostility Inventory (Italian version) and a structured interview concerning social and clinical history; legal problems, age of onset of drug abuse, drug of choice. 3. 3. Serotonergic system sensitivity was evaluated with fenfluramine challenge for PRL assay. 4. 4. Thirty two patients (group A) showed high score for resentment and guilt at BDHI (hostility in), low rate of legal problems, late age of onset, preference for heroin and alcohol. Twenty nine patients (group B) showed high score for assault and irritability at BDHI (hostility out), high rate of legal problems, early age of onset, preference for heroin and cocaine. The other 37 patients (group C) showed aggression score in the normal range at BDHI, no legal problems, late onset of substance abuse, preference for heroin only. 5. 5. PRL responses was blunted in group A (p < 0.001) and significantly decreased in group B (p < 0.05). PRL plasma levels were inversely correlated with HRSD scores. 6. 6. All the patients were included in a treatment protocol with fluoxetine and naltrexone or placebo and naltrexone for 6 months. 7. 7. The treatment was effective in group A with a significant improvement of BDHI results and decrease of craving score, lower level of drop out, lower level of positive urine controls. No significant differences between fluoxetine and placebo effects have been evidenced in patients of group B and C. The present findings suggest that psychopharmacological approach to addiction needs a diagnostic screening for specific subtypes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry Elsevier

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0278-5846
eISSN
1878-4216
DOI
10.1016/0278-5846(95)00262-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gerra Gilberto, Giuseppe Fertonani, Amir Zaimovic, Ines Rota-Graziosi, Paola Avanzini, Rocco Caccavari, Roberto Delsignore and Alfio Lucchini: Hostility in Substance Abusers Subtypes: Fluoxetine and Naltrexone Treatment. Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. & and Biol. Psychiat. 1995, 19(8): 1225–1237. 1. 1. Substance abusers subtypes have been identified considering underlying psychobiological disorder, familial factors, age of onset, legal problems and drug of choice. 2. 2. In the present study the authors submitted 98 male heroin addicted individuals (age 19–28 y) to the Buss Durkee Hostility Inventory (Italian version) and a structured interview concerning social and clinical history; legal problems, age of onset of drug abuse, drug of choice. 3. 3. Serotonergic system sensitivity was evaluated with fenfluramine challenge for PRL assay. 4. 4. Thirty two patients (group A) showed high score for resentment and guilt at BDHI (hostility in), low rate of legal problems, late age of onset, preference for heroin and alcohol. Twenty nine patients (group B) showed high score for assault and irritability at BDHI (hostility out), high rate of legal problems, early age of onset, preference for heroin and cocaine. The other 37 patients (group C) showed aggression score in the normal range at BDHI, no legal problems, late onset of substance abuse, preference for heroin only. 5. 5. PRL responses was blunted in group A (p < 0.001) and significantly decreased in group B (p < 0.05). PRL plasma levels were inversely correlated with HRSD scores. 6. 6. All the patients were included in a treatment protocol with fluoxetine and naltrexone or placebo and naltrexone for 6 months. 7. 7. The treatment was effective in group A with a significant improvement of BDHI results and decrease of craving score, lower level of drop out, lower level of positive urine controls. No significant differences between fluoxetine and placebo effects have been evidenced in patients of group B and C. The present findings suggest that psychopharmacological approach to addiction needs a diagnostic screening for specific subtypes.

Journal

Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological PsychiatryElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 1995

References

  • Serotonin function in detoxified heroin abusers: prolactin and cortisol response to the fenfluramine challenge
    Gerra, G.; Fertonani-Affini, G.; Tagliavini, P.; Riva, M.; Delsignore, R.; Maestri, D.; Caccavari, R.; Brambilla, F.
  • Effect of fluoxetine on alcohol consumption in male alcoholics
    Gorelick, D.A.; Paredes, A.

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