High-throughput sequencing and clinical microbiology: progress, opportunities and challenges

High-throughput sequencing and clinical microbiology: progress, opportunities and challenges High-throughput sequencing is sweeping through clinical microbiology, transforming our discipline in its wake. It is already providing an enhanced view of pathogen biology through rapid and inexpensive whole-genome sequencing and more sophisticated applications such as RNA-seq. It also promises to deliver high-resolution genomic epidemiology as the ultimate typing method for bacteria. However, the most revolutionary effect of this ‘disruptive technology’ is likely to be creation of a novel sequence-based, culture-independent diagnostic microbiology that incorporates microbial community profiling, metagenomics and single-cell genomics. We should prepare for the coming ‘technological singularity’ in sequencing, when this technology becomes so fast and so cheap that it threatens to out-compete existing diagnostic and typing methods in microbiology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Microbiology Elsevier

High-throughput sequencing and clinical microbiology: progress, opportunities and challenges

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1369-5274
DOI
10.1016/j.mib.2010.08.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

High-throughput sequencing is sweeping through clinical microbiology, transforming our discipline in its wake. It is already providing an enhanced view of pathogen biology through rapid and inexpensive whole-genome sequencing and more sophisticated applications such as RNA-seq. It also promises to deliver high-resolution genomic epidemiology as the ultimate typing method for bacteria. However, the most revolutionary effect of this ‘disruptive technology’ is likely to be creation of a novel sequence-based, culture-independent diagnostic microbiology that incorporates microbial community profiling, metagenomics and single-cell genomics. We should prepare for the coming ‘technological singularity’ in sequencing, when this technology becomes so fast and so cheap that it threatens to out-compete existing diagnostic and typing methods in microbiology.

Journal

Current Opinion in MicrobiologyElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2010

References

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    Barrick, J.E.; Yu, D.S.; Yoon, S.H.; Jeong, H.; Oh, T.K.; Schneider, D.; Lenski, R.E.; Kim, J.F.
  • A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene
    Tringe, S.G.; Hugenholtz, P.
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