Haloacetic acids degradation by an efficient Ferrate/UV process: Byproduct analysis, kinetic study, and application of response surface methodology for modeling and optimization

Haloacetic acids degradation by an efficient Ferrate/UV process: Byproduct analysis, kinetic... Haloacetic acids (HAAs) after trihalomethanes are the second main group of chlorination byproducts. In this study, decomposition of the two most common HAAs in drinking water was studied by an advanced oxidation process using a combination of Ferrate [Fe(VI)] and UV irradiation. The decomposition rate was measured, and the byproducts formed during the process and the mass balances were also analyzed. HAAs were quantified by GC-ECD, and the final products including acetate and chloride ions were measured by ion chromatography (IC). A central composite design was used for the experimental design, and the effect of four variables including the initial HAA concentration, pH, Fe(VI) dosage, and contact time were investigated by response surface methodology (RSM). Dichloroacetic acid decomposed more easily than TCAA. Results show that when TCAA and DCAA were studied individually, the degradation rates were 0.0179 and 0.0632 min−1, respectively. When the HAAs were simultaneously placed in the reactor, the decomposition rates of both TCAA and DCAA decreased dramatically. In this case their decomposition rate constants decreased by 67% and 49%, respectively. In the mixture, the decomposition rate of DCAA was 2.5 times higher than that of TCAA. In summary, Fe(VI)/UV process can be used as a promising treatment option for the decomposition of recalcitrant organic pollutants such as HAAs, and RSM can be used for modeling and optimizing the process. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Environmental Management Elsevier

Haloacetic acids degradation by an efficient Ferrate/UV process: Byproduct analysis, kinetic study, and application of response surface methodology for modeling and optimization

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/haloacetic-acids-degradation-by-an-efficient-ferrate-uv-process-pb9TYHEoPh
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-4797
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.07.072
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Haloacetic acids (HAAs) after trihalomethanes are the second main group of chlorination byproducts. In this study, decomposition of the two most common HAAs in drinking water was studied by an advanced oxidation process using a combination of Ferrate [Fe(VI)] and UV irradiation. The decomposition rate was measured, and the byproducts formed during the process and the mass balances were also analyzed. HAAs were quantified by GC-ECD, and the final products including acetate and chloride ions were measured by ion chromatography (IC). A central composite design was used for the experimental design, and the effect of four variables including the initial HAA concentration, pH, Fe(VI) dosage, and contact time were investigated by response surface methodology (RSM). Dichloroacetic acid decomposed more easily than TCAA. Results show that when TCAA and DCAA were studied individually, the degradation rates were 0.0179 and 0.0632 min−1, respectively. When the HAAs were simultaneously placed in the reactor, the decomposition rates of both TCAA and DCAA decreased dramatically. In this case their decomposition rate constants decreased by 67% and 49%, respectively. In the mixture, the decomposition rate of DCAA was 2.5 times higher than that of TCAA. In summary, Fe(VI)/UV process can be used as a promising treatment option for the decomposition of recalcitrant organic pollutants such as HAAs, and RSM can be used for modeling and optimizing the process.

Journal

Journal of Environmental ManagementElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off