GRP78 protects CHO cells from ribosylation

GRP78 protects CHO cells from ribosylation d-Ribose (Rib), a reactive glycation compound that exists in organisms, abnormally increases in the urine of diabetic patients and can yield large amounts of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), leading to cell dysfunction. However, whether cellular proteins are sensitive to this type of glycation is unknown. In this study, we found that cellular AGEs accumulate in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with increased Rib concentration and administration time. Mass spectrum analysis of isolated AGE-modified proteins from cell lysates showed that glucose-regulated protein 78 kD (GRP78) is one of the main ribosylated proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation assays further confirmed the interaction between AGEs and GRP78. Compared with d-glucose (Glc), Rib produced much more AGEs in cells. In kinetic studies, the first order rate constant of LDH released from CHO cells incubated with Rib was nearly 8-fold higher than that of Glc, suggesting that Rib is highly cytotoxic. Immunofluorescent co-localization analysis manifested partial superimposition of AGEs and GRP78, which were distributed throughout the endoplasmic reticulum. Western blotting showed that the expression of GRP78 is up-regulated and then down-regulated in CHO cells during Rib treatment. In the presence of Rib, the suppression of GRP78 expression either with transfected siRNA or with the inhibitor (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) dramatically increased AGE levels and decreased cell viability compared with these parameters in the control groups. GRP78 overexpression decreased AGE levels and rescued the cells from Rib-induced cytotoxicity. These data indicate that GRP78 plays a role in preventing Rib-induced CHO cell cytotoxicity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Cell Research Elsevier

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/grp78-protects-cho-cells-from-ribosylation-0G2WvvPXn2
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0167-4889
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.bbamcr.2018.02.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

d-Ribose (Rib), a reactive glycation compound that exists in organisms, abnormally increases in the urine of diabetic patients and can yield large amounts of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), leading to cell dysfunction. However, whether cellular proteins are sensitive to this type of glycation is unknown. In this study, we found that cellular AGEs accumulate in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with increased Rib concentration and administration time. Mass spectrum analysis of isolated AGE-modified proteins from cell lysates showed that glucose-regulated protein 78 kD (GRP78) is one of the main ribosylated proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation assays further confirmed the interaction between AGEs and GRP78. Compared with d-glucose (Glc), Rib produced much more AGEs in cells. In kinetic studies, the first order rate constant of LDH released from CHO cells incubated with Rib was nearly 8-fold higher than that of Glc, suggesting that Rib is highly cytotoxic. Immunofluorescent co-localization analysis manifested partial superimposition of AGEs and GRP78, which were distributed throughout the endoplasmic reticulum. Western blotting showed that the expression of GRP78 is up-regulated and then down-regulated in CHO cells during Rib treatment. In the presence of Rib, the suppression of GRP78 expression either with transfected siRNA or with the inhibitor (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) dramatically increased AGE levels and decreased cell viability compared with these parameters in the control groups. GRP78 overexpression decreased AGE levels and rescued the cells from Rib-induced cytotoxicity. These data indicate that GRP78 plays a role in preventing Rib-induced CHO cell cytotoxicity.

Journal

Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Cell ResearchElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off