Growth, Inequality and Poverty: Looking Beyond Averages

Growth, Inequality and Poverty: Looking Beyond Averages The available evidence suggests that the poor in developing countries typically do share in the gains from rising aggregate affluence, and in the losses from aggregate contraction. But there are large differences between countries in how much poor people share in growth, and there are diverse impacts among the poor in a given country. Crosscountry correlations are clouded in data problems, and undoubtedly hide welfare impacts; they can be deceptive for development policy. There is a need for deeper micro empirical work on growth and distributional change. Only then will we have a firm basis for identifying the specific policies and programs that are needed to complement growth-oriented policies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png World Development Elsevier

Growth, Inequality and Poverty: Looking Beyond Averages

World Development, Volume 29 (11) – Nov 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/growth-inequality-and-poverty-looking-beyond-averages-GrJfLbs1tA
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0305-750X
eISSN
1873-5991
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0305-750X(01)00072-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The available evidence suggests that the poor in developing countries typically do share in the gains from rising aggregate affluence, and in the losses from aggregate contraction. But there are large differences between countries in how much poor people share in growth, and there are diverse impacts among the poor in a given country. Crosscountry correlations are clouded in data problems, and undoubtedly hide welfare impacts; they can be deceptive for development policy. There is a need for deeper micro empirical work on growth and distributional change. Only then will we have a firm basis for identifying the specific policies and programs that are needed to complement growth-oriented policies.

Journal

World DevelopmentElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2001

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off