Grooming down the hierarchy: allogrooming in captive brown capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella

Grooming down the hierarchy: allogrooming in captive brown capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella Observations of captive female brown capuchin monkeys in five groups revealed that grooming is primarily the occupation of dominant females at both the individual and dyadic levels. When categorized according to rank class, alpha females were the only class to perform significantly more grooming than they received. These results are inconsistent with reports on vervets, baboons and macaques, and suggest that grooming in capuchin monkeys may have different functions from those reported for cercopithecine primates. A dyadic analysis revealed, however, that grooming occurred more often between closely ranked females, similar to what is seen in several Old World monkey species. Therefore, some aspects of grooming in capuchins are similar to that seen in Old World monkeys, but the way they distribute grooming is different, which may prompt a re-evaluation of current theories regarding the social function of allogrooming in non-human primates. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Animal Behaviour Elsevier

Grooming down the hierarchy: allogrooming in captive brown capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour
ISSN
0003-3472
eISSN
1095-8282
D.O.I.
10.1006/anbe.1996.0419
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Observations of captive female brown capuchin monkeys in five groups revealed that grooming is primarily the occupation of dominant females at both the individual and dyadic levels. When categorized according to rank class, alpha females were the only class to perform significantly more grooming than they received. These results are inconsistent with reports on vervets, baboons and macaques, and suggest that grooming in capuchin monkeys may have different functions from those reported for cercopithecine primates. A dyadic analysis revealed, however, that grooming occurred more often between closely ranked females, similar to what is seen in several Old World monkey species. Therefore, some aspects of grooming in capuchins are similar to that seen in Old World monkeys, but the way they distribute grooming is different, which may prompt a re-evaluation of current theories regarding the social function of allogrooming in non-human primates.

Journal

Animal BehaviourElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 1997

References

  • Preliminary data on voluntary food sharing in brown capuchin monkeys
    de Waal, F.B.M.; Luttrell, L.; Canfield, E.

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