Greenhouse gas emissions and energy balances of jatropha biodiesel as an alternative fuel in Tanzania

Greenhouse gas emissions and energy balances of jatropha biodiesel as an alternative fuel in... 1 Introduction</h5> In the bid to mitigate climate change, there is a growing interest in developing alternative fuels, which are renewable and environmentally friendly to fossil fuels. Biomass based fuels such as biodiesel, which is produced from vegetable oils are being considered as the best alternative to fit in this scenario as they are considered to be carbon neutral, thus have the potential to mitigate greenhouse gases, the drivers of global warming.</P>Because of food security issues, non-edible oils such as jatropha curcas oil has gained much attention in different parts of the world including Tanzania as a potential feedstock for biodiesel [1–3] . Jatropha curcas can grow on degraded agricultural soils, infertile wastelands and in arid conditions, thus its growth is believed to have low negative impact on food security of the growing country [4] . However, for the large scale plantations where J. curcas oil is being used as a feedstock for biodiesel to break even, they may require good fertile soil and enough rains which may be supplemented by irrigation for better crop yield, thus high yield of biodiesel. This will conflict the previous defence of the J curcas .</P>Tanzania has been eyed as a land http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biomass and Bioenergy Elsevier

Greenhouse gas emissions and energy balances of jatropha biodiesel as an alternative fuel in Tanzania

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0961-9534
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.biombioe.2013.08.020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> In the bid to mitigate climate change, there is a growing interest in developing alternative fuels, which are renewable and environmentally friendly to fossil fuels. Biomass based fuels such as biodiesel, which is produced from vegetable oils are being considered as the best alternative to fit in this scenario as they are considered to be carbon neutral, thus have the potential to mitigate greenhouse gases, the drivers of global warming.</P>Because of food security issues, non-edible oils such as jatropha curcas oil has gained much attention in different parts of the world including Tanzania as a potential feedstock for biodiesel [1–3] . Jatropha curcas can grow on degraded agricultural soils, infertile wastelands and in arid conditions, thus its growth is believed to have low negative impact on food security of the growing country [4] . However, for the large scale plantations where J. curcas oil is being used as a feedstock for biodiesel to break even, they may require good fertile soil and enough rains which may be supplemented by irrigation for better crop yield, thus high yield of biodiesel. This will conflict the previous defence of the J curcas .</P>Tanzania has been eyed as a land

Journal

Biomass and BioenergyElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2013

References

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