Glycemic indices, glycemic loads, and glycemic dietetics

Glycemic indices, glycemic loads, and glycemic dietetics Low-glycemic diets based on the glycemic index (GI) are being recommended for the avoidance and amelioration of the numerous diseases in humans and animals that involve insulin resistance, such as diabetes mellitus type 2 and coronary heart disease in people and some forms of laminitis, exertional rhabdomyolysis, and developmental orthopedic disease in horses. The root hypothesis is that control of postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia will help those who have compromised glucose homeostasis—up to 17% of the human population and all of the horses chronically adapted to sweet feed. This prospect has broken out of the scientific literature, with many books and magazine articles being written for the public. In our opinion, the promise of low-glycemic diets is being emphasized without due regard to current limitations (see Addendum). This commentary aims to clarify salient points and achieve a reasonable balance for current expectations for glycemic dietetics in the horse.</P><h5>Glycemic indices</h5> The high-carbohydrate, low-lipid diet was strongly recommended in the 1970s to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Meals exaggerated glycemic and insulinemic responses, disturbing glucose homeostasis. Carbohydrate analysis of foods failed to predict the degree of these fluctuations. Consequently, foods had to be tested and compared against a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Elsevier

Glycemic indices, glycemic loads, and glycemic dietetics

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/glycemic-indices-glycemic-loads-and-glycemic-dietetics-ehqByPYaQW
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0737-0806
eISSN
1542-7412
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jevs.2004.08.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Low-glycemic diets based on the glycemic index (GI) are being recommended for the avoidance and amelioration of the numerous diseases in humans and animals that involve insulin resistance, such as diabetes mellitus type 2 and coronary heart disease in people and some forms of laminitis, exertional rhabdomyolysis, and developmental orthopedic disease in horses. The root hypothesis is that control of postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia will help those who have compromised glucose homeostasis—up to 17% of the human population and all of the horses chronically adapted to sweet feed. This prospect has broken out of the scientific literature, with many books and magazine articles being written for the public. In our opinion, the promise of low-glycemic diets is being emphasized without due regard to current limitations (see Addendum). This commentary aims to clarify salient points and achieve a reasonable balance for current expectations for glycemic dietetics in the horse.</P><h5>Glycemic indices</h5> The high-carbohydrate, low-lipid diet was strongly recommended in the 1970s to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Meals exaggerated glycemic and insulinemic responses, disturbing glucose homeostasis. Carbohydrate analysis of foods failed to predict the degree of these fluctuations. Consequently, foods had to be tested and compared against a

Journal

Journal of Equine Veterinary ScienceElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2004

References

  • A review of factors affecting carbohydrate levels in forage
    Watts, KA; Chatterton, NJ
  • Effect of dietary starch, fat and bicarbonate content on exercise responses and serum creatine kinase activity in equine recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis
    McKenzie, EC; Valberg, SJ; Godden, SM
  • A moderate glycemic meal before endurance exercise can enhance performance
    Kirwin, JP; O'Gorman, D; Evans, WJ

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off