Gender and Negotiator Competitiveness: A Meta-analysis

Gender and Negotiator Competitiveness: A Meta-analysis Although there have been numerous investigations into the relationship between gender and bargaining competitiveness over the past several decades, few conclusions have been reached. The results of 62 research reports on the relationship between gender and competitive behavior in dyadic bargaining interactions were examined by meta-analytic review. The average weighted effect size indicated that women appear to behave more cooperatively in negotiations than men, but this difference is slight. Results suggest that constraints on negotiators (imposed by abstract bargaining paradigms and restrictions on communication) lessen gender differences in negotiation behavior. Women were significantly more competitive than men when competing against an opponent who pursued a “tit-for-tat” bargaining strategy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes Elsevier

Gender and Negotiator Competitiveness: A Meta-analysis

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/gender-and-negotiator-competitiveness-a-meta-analysis-IMPGm0MAmI
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Academic Press
ISSN
0749-5978
D.O.I.
10.1006/obhd.1998.2797
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although there have been numerous investigations into the relationship between gender and bargaining competitiveness over the past several decades, few conclusions have been reached. The results of 62 research reports on the relationship between gender and competitive behavior in dyadic bargaining interactions were examined by meta-analytic review. The average weighted effect size indicated that women appear to behave more cooperatively in negotiations than men, but this difference is slight. Results suggest that constraints on negotiators (imposed by abstract bargaining paradigms and restrictions on communication) lessen gender differences in negotiation behavior. Women were significantly more competitive than men when competing against an opponent who pursued a “tit-for-tat” bargaining strategy.

Journal

Organizational Behavior and Human Decision ProcessesElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 1998

References

  • Media effects and communication bias in diverse groups
    Bhappu, A.D.; Griffith, T.L.; Northcraft, G.B.
  • A model for resolving conflict: Some theoretical, empirical and practical implications
    Littlefield, L.; Love, A.; Peck, C.; Wertheim, E.
  • Computer-assisted negotiation and mediation: Where we are and where we are going
    Shell, G.R.
  • Managers as negotiators: A test of power versus gender as predictors of feelings, behavior, and outcomes
    Watson, C.; Hoffman, L.R.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off