Gastric microbiota: An emerging player in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric malignancies

Gastric microbiota: An emerging player in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric malignancies The complex diversity of nonpathogenic microbes that colonize the human body, known as microbiota, exert considerable effects on physiological homeostasis, and immune regulation. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a bacterium that frequently colonizes human stomach and is a major pathogenic agent for peptic ulcer diseases, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Due to its acidic pH and peristaltic movements, the stomach has been considered a hostile environment for most microorganisms, however various commensal microorganisms are capable of colonizing the stomach to form a stomach niche. Recent pieces of evidence indicate that commensal gastric microbes or their metabolites influence the capability of H. pylori to colonize the stomach and directly modulate its pathogenicity and carcinogenic potential. In this article, we present an overview of recent advances in the understanding of H. pylori-commensal interactions in the pathogenesis and clinical evolution of H. pylori-associated gastric malignancies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Letters Elsevier

Gastric microbiota: An emerging player in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric malignancies

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0304-3835
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.canlet.2017.11.009
Publisher site
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Abstract

The complex diversity of nonpathogenic microbes that colonize the human body, known as microbiota, exert considerable effects on physiological homeostasis, and immune regulation. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a bacterium that frequently colonizes human stomach and is a major pathogenic agent for peptic ulcer diseases, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Due to its acidic pH and peristaltic movements, the stomach has been considered a hostile environment for most microorganisms, however various commensal microorganisms are capable of colonizing the stomach to form a stomach niche. Recent pieces of evidence indicate that commensal gastric microbes or their metabolites influence the capability of H. pylori to colonize the stomach and directly modulate its pathogenicity and carcinogenic potential. In this article, we present an overview of recent advances in the understanding of H. pylori-commensal interactions in the pathogenesis and clinical evolution of H. pylori-associated gastric malignancies.

Journal

Cancer LettersElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

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