From social integration to health: Durkheim in the new millennium ☆ ☆ This paper is adapted from Berkman, L.F., & Glass, T. Social integration, social networks, social support and health. In L. F. Berkman & I. Kawachi, Social Epidemiology . New York: Oxford University Press; and Brissette, I., Cohen S., Seeman, T. Measuring social integration and social networks. In S. Cohen, L. Underwood & B. Gottlieb, Social Support Measurements and Intervention . New York: Oxford University Press.

From social integration to health: Durkheim in the new millennium ☆ ☆ This paper is adapted... It is widely recognized that social relationships and affiliation have powerful effects on physical and mental health. When investigators write about the impact of social relationships on health, many terms are used loosely and interchangeably including social networks, social ties and social integration. The aim of this paper is to clarify these terms using a single framework. We discuss: (1) theoretical orientations from diverse disciplines which we believe are fundamental to advancing research in this area; (2) a set of definitions accompanied by major assessment tools; and (3) an overarching model which integrates multilevel phenomena. Theoretical orientations that we draw upon were developed by Durkheim whose work on social integration and suicide are seminal and John Bowlby, a psychiatrist who developed attachment theory in relation to child development and contemporary social network theorists. We present a conceptual model of how social networks impact health. We envision a cascading causal process beginning with the macro-social to psychobiological processes that are dynamically linked together to form the processes by which social integration effects health. We start by embedding social networks in a larger social and cultural context in which upstream forces are seen to condition network structure. Serious consideration of the larger macro-social context in which networks form and are sustained has been lacking in all but a small number of studies and is almost completely absent in studies of social network influences on health. We then move downstream to understand the influences network structure and function have on social and interpersonal behavior. We argue that networks operate at the behavioral level through four primary pathways: (1) provision of social support; (2) social influence; (3) on social engagement and attachment; and (4) access to resources and material goods. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Science & Medicine Elsevier

From social integration to health: Durkheim in the new millennium ☆ ☆ This paper is adapted from Berkman, L.F., & Glass, T. Social integration, social networks, social support and health. In L. F. Berkman & I. Kawachi, Social Epidemiology . New York: Oxford University Press; and Brissette, I., Cohen S., Seeman, T. Measuring social integration and social networks. In S. Cohen, L. Underwood & B. Gottlieb, Social Support Measurements and Intervention . New York: Oxford University Press.

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0277-9536
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0277-9536(00)00065-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is widely recognized that social relationships and affiliation have powerful effects on physical and mental health. When investigators write about the impact of social relationships on health, many terms are used loosely and interchangeably including social networks, social ties and social integration. The aim of this paper is to clarify these terms using a single framework. We discuss: (1) theoretical orientations from diverse disciplines which we believe are fundamental to advancing research in this area; (2) a set of definitions accompanied by major assessment tools; and (3) an overarching model which integrates multilevel phenomena. Theoretical orientations that we draw upon were developed by Durkheim whose work on social integration and suicide are seminal and John Bowlby, a psychiatrist who developed attachment theory in relation to child development and contemporary social network theorists. We present a conceptual model of how social networks impact health. We envision a cascading causal process beginning with the macro-social to psychobiological processes that are dynamically linked together to form the processes by which social integration effects health. We start by embedding social networks in a larger social and cultural context in which upstream forces are seen to condition network structure. Serious consideration of the larger macro-social context in which networks form and are sustained has been lacking in all but a small number of studies and is almost completely absent in studies of social network influences on health. We then move downstream to understand the influences network structure and function have on social and interpersonal behavior. We argue that networks operate at the behavioral level through four primary pathways: (1) provision of social support; (2) social influence; (3) on social engagement and attachment; and (4) access to resources and material goods.

Journal

Social Science & MedicineElsevier

Published: Sep 15, 2000

References

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  • An investigation of self-efficacy, partner support and daily stresses as predictors of relapse to smoking in self-quitters
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    Link, B.; Phelan, J.
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    Mendes de Leon, C.; Seeman, T.E.; Baker, D.; Richardson, E.; Tinetti, M.
  • Early determinants of behaviour: evidence from primate studies
    Suomi, S.
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    Wasserman, S.; Faust, K.

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