From roadkill to road ecology: A review of the ecological effects of roads

From roadkill to road ecology: A review of the ecological effects of roads Transportation infrastructure affects the structure of ecosystems, the dynamics of ecosystem function, and has direct effects on ecosystem components, including their species composition. Clearly, the construction of transport lines results in the direct destruction and removal of existing ecosystems, and the reconfiguration of local landforms. However, transportation systems, and more specifically, roads, have a wide variety of primary, or direct, ecological effects as well as secondary, or indirect, ecological effects on the landscapes that they penetrate. The effects of roads can be measured in both abiotic and biotic components of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The nature of road systems as network structures renders vast areas of the landscape as road-affected, with small patches of isolated habitat remaining beyond the ecological influence of roads. The increasing attention of scientists to the unintended ecological effects of roads has resulted in the emergence of the science of “Road Ecology,” marked with the publication of a multi-authored volume, Road Ecology: Science and Solutions , in 2003. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Transport Geography Elsevier

From roadkill to road ecology: A review of the ecological effects of roads

Journal of Transport Geography, Volume 15 (5) – Sep 1, 2007

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0966-6923
eISSN
1873-1236
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2006.11.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Transportation infrastructure affects the structure of ecosystems, the dynamics of ecosystem function, and has direct effects on ecosystem components, including their species composition. Clearly, the construction of transport lines results in the direct destruction and removal of existing ecosystems, and the reconfiguration of local landforms. However, transportation systems, and more specifically, roads, have a wide variety of primary, or direct, ecological effects as well as secondary, or indirect, ecological effects on the landscapes that they penetrate. The effects of roads can be measured in both abiotic and biotic components of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The nature of road systems as network structures renders vast areas of the landscape as road-affected, with small patches of isolated habitat remaining beyond the ecological influence of roads. The increasing attention of scientists to the unintended ecological effects of roads has resulted in the emergence of the science of “Road Ecology,” marked with the publication of a multi-authored volume, Road Ecology: Science and Solutions , in 2003.

Journal

Journal of Transport GeographyElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2007

References

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