From molecules to mating: Rapid evolution and biochemical studies of reproductive proteins

From molecules to mating: Rapid evolution and biochemical studies of reproductive proteins 1 Introduction</h5> Sexual reproduction, while prevalent along every branch of the tree of life, remains a challenge for evolutionary biologists to explain [1] . Asexual reproduction offers the advantages of propagating twice the genetic material, lacks the costs associated with finding mates, and can more rapidly establish favorable epistatic effects [2] . Early mathematical models also supported asexual reproduction as the optimal reproductive strategy. However, in more realistic scenarios of dynamic ecosystems with changing environments and co-evolving symbiotes, frequent recombination is needed and natural selection favors sexual reproduction [3,4] . Given the breadth and diversity of sexually reproducing organisms, it is no surprise that various strategies have evolved to improve reproductive success. In animals, males often perform various courtship displays [5–7] , deliver pheromones that affect female behavior and physiology [8–10] , and regulate the contents of their ejaculate based on female quality [11,12] . Similarly, to improve mate fitness and quality, females must be able to discriminate between these cues for honest or dishonest signals of fitness [13] . Both the male and female characteristics involved can be modified by sexual selection. Under sexual reproduction, mates must be procured to provide complementary genetic material, much like a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Proteomics Elsevier

From molecules to mating: Rapid evolution and biochemical studies of reproductive proteins

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
1874-3919
eISSN
1876-7737
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jprot.2015.06.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Sexual reproduction, while prevalent along every branch of the tree of life, remains a challenge for evolutionary biologists to explain [1] . Asexual reproduction offers the advantages of propagating twice the genetic material, lacks the costs associated with finding mates, and can more rapidly establish favorable epistatic effects [2] . Early mathematical models also supported asexual reproduction as the optimal reproductive strategy. However, in more realistic scenarios of dynamic ecosystems with changing environments and co-evolving symbiotes, frequent recombination is needed and natural selection favors sexual reproduction [3,4] . Given the breadth and diversity of sexually reproducing organisms, it is no surprise that various strategies have evolved to improve reproductive success. In animals, males often perform various courtship displays [5–7] , deliver pheromones that affect female behavior and physiology [8–10] , and regulate the contents of their ejaculate based on female quality [11,12] . Similarly, to improve mate fitness and quality, females must be able to discriminate between these cues for honest or dishonest signals of fitness [13] . Both the male and female characteristics involved can be modified by sexual selection. Under sexual reproduction, mates must be procured to provide complementary genetic material, much like a

Journal

Journal of ProteomicsElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2016

References

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