Formation mechanism of secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of gasoline vehicle exhaust

Formation mechanism of secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of gasoline vehicle exhaust Gasoline vehicles are a major source of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). However, current models based on known precursors fail to explain the substantial SOAs from vehicle emissions due to the inadequate understanding of the formation mechanism. To provide more information on this issue, the formation of SOAs from ozonolysis of four light-duty gasoline vehicle exhaust systems was investigated with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometer (VUV-PIMS). Remarkable SOAs formation was observed and the SOAs were primarily aliphatic alkenes. PI mass spectra of the SOAs from all vehicles exhibited similar spectral patterns (a regular mass group with m/z at 98, 112, 126 …). Interestingly, most carbonyl products of aliphatic alkenes observed as major gaseous products have specific molecular weights, and the main formation pathway of SOAs can be explained well using aldol condensation reactions of these carbonyls. This is a direct observation of the aldol condensation as a dominated pathway for SOAs formation, and the first report on the composition and formation mechanism of the SOAs from the ozonolysis of gasoline vehicle exhaust is given. The study reveals that low molecular weight alkenes may play a more significant role in vehicle-induced SOAs formation than previously believed. More importantly, the PI mass spectra of SOAs from vehicles show similarities to the field aerosol sample mass spectra, suggesting the possible significance of the aldol condensation reactions in ambient aerosol formation. Since carbonyls are a major degradation product of biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs through atmospheric oxidation processes, the mechanism proposed in this study can be applied more generally to explain aerosol formation from the oxidation of atmospheric hydrocarbons. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Formation mechanism of secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of gasoline vehicle exhaust

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/formation-mechanism-of-secondary-organic-aerosol-from-ozonolysis-of-0aNdv6lFXt
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.12.048
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gasoline vehicles are a major source of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). However, current models based on known precursors fail to explain the substantial SOAs from vehicle emissions due to the inadequate understanding of the formation mechanism. To provide more information on this issue, the formation of SOAs from ozonolysis of four light-duty gasoline vehicle exhaust systems was investigated with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometer (VUV-PIMS). Remarkable SOAs formation was observed and the SOAs were primarily aliphatic alkenes. PI mass spectra of the SOAs from all vehicles exhibited similar spectral patterns (a regular mass group with m/z at 98, 112, 126 …). Interestingly, most carbonyl products of aliphatic alkenes observed as major gaseous products have specific molecular weights, and the main formation pathway of SOAs can be explained well using aldol condensation reactions of these carbonyls. This is a direct observation of the aldol condensation as a dominated pathway for SOAs formation, and the first report on the composition and formation mechanism of the SOAs from the ozonolysis of gasoline vehicle exhaust is given. The study reveals that low molecular weight alkenes may play a more significant role in vehicle-induced SOAs formation than previously believed. More importantly, the PI mass spectra of SOAs from vehicles show similarities to the field aerosol sample mass spectra, suggesting the possible significance of the aldol condensation reactions in ambient aerosol formation. Since carbonyls are a major degradation product of biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs through atmospheric oxidation processes, the mechanism proposed in this study can be applied more generally to explain aerosol formation from the oxidation of atmospheric hydrocarbons.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off