Forest tenure reform in the age of climate change: Lessons for REDD+

Forest tenure reform in the age of climate change: Lessons for REDD+ Research highlights &z.rtrif; Numerous academics and activists have expressed concern about the rights of communities living in forests in light of the climate change mitigation scheme known as reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD+). REDD+ could leave out forest communities, or have positive or negative effects. The two specific arenas studied are tenure rights and rules for forest use. &z.rtrif; The findings of a study on forest tenure reforms in 10 countries are examined to exact lessons learned in light of these concerns. It demonstrates that even when rural communities win new rights to forest resources, they face numerous obstacles in implementation and in the enjoyment of rights in practice. &z.rtrif; Where there is support for securing community rights, REDD+ will be implemented in governance contexts similar to the ones in which these reforms have taken place. Where there is not, the context may be even more unfavourable to communities. Better outcomes are only likely if REDD+ efforts are accompanied by a substantial effort to challenge the status quo. Binding agreements to protect local rights may be needed. &z.rtrif; Not only would the failure to defend community rights and the imposition of externally designed rules have a detrimental impact on communities, but this could also put the REDD+ project at risk. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Environmental Change Elsevier

Forest tenure reform in the age of climate change: Lessons for REDD+

Global Environmental Change, Volume 21 (2) – May 1, 2011

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-3780
DOI
10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2010.11.008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research highlights &z.rtrif; Numerous academics and activists have expressed concern about the rights of communities living in forests in light of the climate change mitigation scheme known as reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD+). REDD+ could leave out forest communities, or have positive or negative effects. The two specific arenas studied are tenure rights and rules for forest use. &z.rtrif; The findings of a study on forest tenure reforms in 10 countries are examined to exact lessons learned in light of these concerns. It demonstrates that even when rural communities win new rights to forest resources, they face numerous obstacles in implementation and in the enjoyment of rights in practice. &z.rtrif; Where there is support for securing community rights, REDD+ will be implemented in governance contexts similar to the ones in which these reforms have taken place. Where there is not, the context may be even more unfavourable to communities. Better outcomes are only likely if REDD+ efforts are accompanied by a substantial effort to challenge the status quo. Binding agreements to protect local rights may be needed. &z.rtrif; Not only would the failure to defend community rights and the imposition of externally designed rules have a detrimental impact on communities, but this could also put the REDD+ project at risk.

Journal

Global Environmental ChangeElsevier

Published: May 1, 2011

References

  • The risks and reconstruction model for resettling displaced populations
    Cernea, M.
  • How can market mechanisms for forest environmental services help the poor? Preliminary lessons from Latin America
    Grieg-Gran, M.; Porras, I.; Wunder, S.
  • The poverty of forestry policy: double standards on an uneven playing field
    Larson, A.M.; Ribot, J.C.
  • REDD-plus, forest people's rights and nested climate governance
    Sikor, R.; Stahl, J.; Enters, R.; Ribot, J.C.; Singh, N.; Sunderlin, W.D.; Wollenberg, L.
  • Too much for too few: problems of indigenous land rights in Latin America
    Stocks, A.
  • Decentralization, forest and livelihoods: theory and narrative
    Tacconi, L.

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