Food intake and growth in reared early juvenile cuttlefish Sepia officinalis L. (Mollusca Cephalopoda)

Food intake and growth in reared early juvenile cuttlefish Sepia officinalis L. (Mollusca... Experimental rearing of juvenile cuttlefish was carried out in a semi-closed system for 40 days at 19°C. Different quantities of live food were offered to isolated animals. The actual ingestion rate was enhanced by the amount of food offered, this tendency decreasing with age. Frozen food was ingested at the same rate, but was less effective than live food for growth. The quantity of food ingested during the first 20–30 days of life seems to affect further growth, especially weight increase. Aspartate transcarbamylase activity appeared to be a good indicator for the early phase of growth (first 20–30 days) which is likely due to hyperplasy, and moreover for predicting future growth. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Elsevier

Food intake and growth in reared early juvenile cuttlefish Sepia officinalis L. (Mollusca Cephalopoda)

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0022-0981
eISSN
1879-1697
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0022-0981(99)00054-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Experimental rearing of juvenile cuttlefish was carried out in a semi-closed system for 40 days at 19°C. Different quantities of live food were offered to isolated animals. The actual ingestion rate was enhanced by the amount of food offered, this tendency decreasing with age. Frozen food was ingested at the same rate, but was less effective than live food for growth. The quantity of food ingested during the first 20–30 days of life seems to affect further growth, especially weight increase. Aspartate transcarbamylase activity appeared to be a good indicator for the early phase of growth (first 20–30 days) which is likely due to hyperplasy, and moreover for predicting future growth.

Journal

Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and EcologyElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 1999

References

  • Do cuttlefish (Cephalopoda) signal their intentions to conspecifics during agonistic encounters?
    Adamo, S.A.; Hanlon, R.T.
  • Absence of social recognition in laboratory-reared cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis L. (Mollusca Cephalopoda)
    Boal, J.G.
  • Change in composition of digestive gland and mantle muscle of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis during starvation
    Castro, B.G.; Garrido, J.L.; Sotelo, C.G.

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