Flexible cell culture device made of membrane-type silicone composites for simulating human body

Flexible cell culture device made of membrane-type silicone composites for simulating human body Human tissues are exposed to various mechanical stimuli, and the types and magnitudes of the mechanical stimuli acting on cells and tissues are important factors in controlling the development pathway of cells and tissues. Therefore, giving repetitive mechanical stimuli to culturing cells may provide beneficial effects, such as differentiating target cells or accelerating cell development, by controlling the type of stimulus and its magnitude. Electroactive polymers (EAPs) respond to electrical voltage with significant changes in shape or size and can transfer appropriate (1–20%) mechanical stimuli to cells. In this study, we designed a new type of flexible cell culture device made of silicone (composite) film, and evaluated the actuating strain of the driving portion of the cell culture device according to the pre-stretching condition and the clay nanoparticle (i.e., organically modified montmorillonite, or OMMT) content. The effect of OMMT particles on the electro-mechanical performance of the silicone (composite) film actuators was investigated by adding 0–5% OMMT particles to silicone elastomer using the solvent-assisted mixing method. The effects of these two major variables on actuation strain were quantitatively investigated, and the most appropriate conditions for the driving part of a cell culture device were determined. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Composite Structures Elsevier

Flexible cell culture device made of membrane-type silicone composites for simulating human body

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/flexible-cell-culture-device-made-of-membrane-type-silicone-composites-V434JUB3Dm
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0263-8223
eISSN
1879-1085
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.compstruct.2015.08.054
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Human tissues are exposed to various mechanical stimuli, and the types and magnitudes of the mechanical stimuli acting on cells and tissues are important factors in controlling the development pathway of cells and tissues. Therefore, giving repetitive mechanical stimuli to culturing cells may provide beneficial effects, such as differentiating target cells or accelerating cell development, by controlling the type of stimulus and its magnitude. Electroactive polymers (EAPs) respond to electrical voltage with significant changes in shape or size and can transfer appropriate (1–20%) mechanical stimuli to cells. In this study, we designed a new type of flexible cell culture device made of silicone (composite) film, and evaluated the actuating strain of the driving portion of the cell culture device according to the pre-stretching condition and the clay nanoparticle (i.e., organically modified montmorillonite, or OMMT) content. The effect of OMMT particles on the electro-mechanical performance of the silicone (composite) film actuators was investigated by adding 0–5% OMMT particles to silicone elastomer using the solvent-assisted mixing method. The effects of these two major variables on actuation strain were quantitatively investigated, and the most appropriate conditions for the driving part of a cell culture device were determined.

Journal

Composite StructuresElsevier

Published: Dec 15, 2015

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial