Fiber type effect on tribological behavior when cutting natural fiber reinforced plastics

Fiber type effect on tribological behavior when cutting natural fiber reinforced plastics Recently, natural fiber reinforced plastic (NFRP) materials are becoming a viable alternative to synthetic fiber in many industrial applications which do not require high structural performances. However, machining of NFRP such as milling process is almost unavoidable operation to facilitate the parts assembly in addition to the finishing of final products. The present study thus focused on the influence of natural fiber types on tribological behavior during profile milling process. Three types of short natural fibers (bamboo, sisal and miscanthus) reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites are investigated. The quality of NFRP machined surface is quantified using a multiscale analysis based on wavelets decomposition. The natural fiber effects related to the machined surface quality is hence identified at all scales from roughness to waviness. The bamboo fibers reinforced plastics which exhibit high contact stiffness show the smoother surface finish after machining. Therefore, the multiscale surface roughness is used as descriptor of natural fiber influence on the machining mechanisms and to establish the cutting signature of NFRP materials. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wear Elsevier

Fiber type effect on tribological behavior when cutting natural fiber reinforced plastics

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/fiber-type-effect-on-tribological-behavior-when-cutting-natural-fiber-QwzYknYYRL
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0043-1648
eISSN
1873-2577
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.wear.2014.12.039
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recently, natural fiber reinforced plastic (NFRP) materials are becoming a viable alternative to synthetic fiber in many industrial applications which do not require high structural performances. However, machining of NFRP such as milling process is almost unavoidable operation to facilitate the parts assembly in addition to the finishing of final products. The present study thus focused on the influence of natural fiber types on tribological behavior during profile milling process. Three types of short natural fibers (bamboo, sisal and miscanthus) reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites are investigated. The quality of NFRP machined surface is quantified using a multiscale analysis based on wavelets decomposition. The natural fiber effects related to the machined surface quality is hence identified at all scales from roughness to waviness. The bamboo fibers reinforced plastics which exhibit high contact stiffness show the smoother surface finish after machining. Therefore, the multiscale surface roughness is used as descriptor of natural fiber influence on the machining mechanisms and to establish the cutting signature of NFRP materials.

Journal

WearElsevier

Published: May 1, 2015

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off