Fecal Microbiota Transfer May Increase Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases–Associated Bacteria

Fecal Microbiota Transfer May Increase Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel... Dear Sir: With a great interest we have read the article by Vrieze et al, 1 entitled “Transfer of Intestinal Microbiota From Lean Donors Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Individuals With Metabolic Syndrome.” The demonstrated potential of the fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) to improve insulin sensitivity in humans has resulted in a number of enthusiastic responses, including ours. However, we would like to emphasize that the interpretation of the results of the study may not be always as straightforward as presented in the article. We feel the need to outline below several important findings in the aforementioned article regarding the data on the changes in the human microbiota after FMT.</P>As presented in Figure 2 and in Supplementary Tables 3 and 4, but not discussed in the paper, the allogenic FMT has led to a significantly increased number of bacteria such as Alcaligens faecalis et rel. in the small intestinal biopsy samples of the patients involved. The abundance of Dorea formicigenerans et rel, Clostridium sphenoides et rel, C nexile et rel, and Ruminococcus lactaris et rel has also been significantly elevated in the fecal samples after the allogenic FMT. It is notable that bacteria identified as Alcaligens spp are often http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Gastroenterology Elsevier

Fecal Microbiota Transfer May Increase Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases–Associated Bacteria

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute
ISSN
0016-5085
eISSN
1528-0012
D.O.I.
10.1053/j.gastro.2012.12.040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dear Sir: With a great interest we have read the article by Vrieze et al, 1 entitled “Transfer of Intestinal Microbiota From Lean Donors Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Individuals With Metabolic Syndrome.” The demonstrated potential of the fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) to improve insulin sensitivity in humans has resulted in a number of enthusiastic responses, including ours. However, we would like to emphasize that the interpretation of the results of the study may not be always as straightforward as presented in the article. We feel the need to outline below several important findings in the aforementioned article regarding the data on the changes in the human microbiota after FMT.</P>As presented in Figure 2 and in Supplementary Tables 3 and 4, but not discussed in the paper, the allogenic FMT has led to a significantly increased number of bacteria such as Alcaligens faecalis et rel. in the small intestinal biopsy samples of the patients involved. The abundance of Dorea formicigenerans et rel, Clostridium sphenoides et rel, C nexile et rel, and Ruminococcus lactaris et rel has also been significantly elevated in the fecal samples after the allogenic FMT. It is notable that bacteria identified as Alcaligens spp are often

Journal

GastroenterologyElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2013

References

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