Extracellular serotonin is decreased in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal from cocaine self-administration

Extracellular serotonin is decreased in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal from cocaine... Many of the withdrawal symptoms reported by human cocaine users are thought to be correlated with serotonergic dysfunction. To explore the neurochemical basis for this hypothesis, we used in vivo microdialysis to monitor extracellular serotonin (5-HT) in the nucleus accumbens of the rat both during and for several hours after unlimited-access intravenous cocaine self-administration. Self-administration of cocaine produced an increase of approx. 340% of baseline in the dialysate concentration of 5-HT that persisted for the entire 12 h session. During the first 6 h after self-administration, dialysate 5-HT levels were significantly decreased to 41% of pre-session levels and 25% of the levels in drug-naive control animals. The effects of cocaine exposure on basal extracellular 5-HT concentrations were also examined using a quantitative microdialysis method (Difference Method). Rats withdrawing from extended-access cocaine self-administration displayed significantly lower extracellular 5-HT levels (0.6 ± 0.3 nM) than either drug-naive control animals (2.0 ± 0.5 nM) or animals which received daily 3-h self-administration training sessions only (limited-access; 1.4 ± 0.2 nM). Together these results indicate that extracellular 5-HT is significantly decreased in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal from cocaine self-administration. The severity of this decrease is contingent on the length of time cocaine is self-administered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavioural Brain Research Elsevier

Extracellular serotonin is decreased in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal from cocaine self-administration

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0166-4328
DOI
10.1016/0166-4328(96)00101-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many of the withdrawal symptoms reported by human cocaine users are thought to be correlated with serotonergic dysfunction. To explore the neurochemical basis for this hypothesis, we used in vivo microdialysis to monitor extracellular serotonin (5-HT) in the nucleus accumbens of the rat both during and for several hours after unlimited-access intravenous cocaine self-administration. Self-administration of cocaine produced an increase of approx. 340% of baseline in the dialysate concentration of 5-HT that persisted for the entire 12 h session. During the first 6 h after self-administration, dialysate 5-HT levels were significantly decreased to 41% of pre-session levels and 25% of the levels in drug-naive control animals. The effects of cocaine exposure on basal extracellular 5-HT concentrations were also examined using a quantitative microdialysis method (Difference Method). Rats withdrawing from extended-access cocaine self-administration displayed significantly lower extracellular 5-HT levels (0.6 ± 0.3 nM) than either drug-naive control animals (2.0 ± 0.5 nM) or animals which received daily 3-h self-administration training sessions only (limited-access; 1.4 ± 0.2 nM). Together these results indicate that extracellular 5-HT is significantly decreased in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal from cocaine self-administration. The severity of this decrease is contingent on the length of time cocaine is self-administered.

Journal

Behavioural Brain ResearchElsevier

Published: Dec 15, 1995

References

  • A microdialysis method allowing characterization of intercellular water space in humans
    Lönnroth, P.; Jansson, P.A.; Smith, U.
  • Basal extracellular dopamine is decreased in the rat nucleus accumbens during abstinence from chronic cocaine
    Parsons, L.H.; Smith, A.D.; Justice, J.B.
  • Chronic cocaine enhances serotonin autoregulation and serotonin uptake binding
    Cunningham, K.A.; Paris, J.M.; Goeders, N.E.

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