Extension of the PMV model to non-air-conditioned buildings in warm climates

Extension of the PMV model to non-air-conditioned buildings in warm climates The PMV model agrees well with high-quality field studies in buildings with HVAC systems, situated in cold, temperate and warm climates, studied during both summer and winter. In non-air-conditioned buildings in warm climates, occupants may sense the warmth as being less severe than the PMV predicts. The main reason is low expectations, but a metabolic rate that is estimated too high can also contribute to explaining the difference. An extension of the PMV model that includes an expectancy factor is introduced for use in non-air-conditioned buildings in warm climates. The extended PMV model agrees well with quality field studies in non-air-conditioned buildings of three continents. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Energy and Buildings Elsevier

Extension of the PMV model to non-air-conditioned buildings in warm climates

Energy and Buildings, Volume 34 (6) – Jul 1, 2002

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0378-7788
eISSN
1872-6178
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0378-7788(02)00003-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The PMV model agrees well with high-quality field studies in buildings with HVAC systems, situated in cold, temperate and warm climates, studied during both summer and winter. In non-air-conditioned buildings in warm climates, occupants may sense the warmth as being less severe than the PMV predicts. The main reason is low expectations, but a metabolic rate that is estimated too high can also contribute to explaining the difference. An extension of the PMV model that includes an expectancy factor is introduced for use in non-air-conditioned buildings in warm climates. The extended PMV model agrees well with quality field studies in non-air-conditioned buildings of three continents.

Journal

Energy and BuildingsElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2002

References

  • Thermal adaptation in the built environment: a literature review
    Brager, G.S.; de Dear, R.
  • Thermal sensations resulting from sudden ambient temperature changes
    de Dear, R.; Ring, J.W.; Fanger, P.O.

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