Exploring the relationship between major hazard, fatal and non-fatal accidents through outcomes and causes

Exploring the relationship between major hazard, fatal and non-fatal accidents through outcomes... 1 Introduction</h5> Occupational accidents are frequent, usually single victim, events. There are statistics on their numbers, such as published by the European Commission (2009) . Amongst occupational accidents fatal accidents are rarer events than the non-fatal ( Hämäläinen et al., 2009 ). Multiple fatality occupational accidents are even rarer and may be referred to as catastrophes e.g. in the US the Occupational Safety and Health Administration describes in-patient hospitalisation of three or more employees as a catastrophe ( US Department of Labour, 2014 ). Major accidents, a term generally associated with process safety and involving fire, explosion or toxic emission ( EU Council, 1996 ), are also rare events and usually result in publically available investigation reports. So, a catastrophe or a major accident is denoted by its significant consequences such as multiple fatalities or the potential for multiple fatalities or an accident which causes significant social unrest. Well known major accident examples are the Union Carbide chemical loss of containment disaster at Bhopal in India in 1984 with 2500 deaths being reported within 5 days or the radioactive release from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion in the Ukraine in 1986 leaving large areas contaminated with radioactive http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Safety Science Elsevier

Exploring the relationship between major hazard, fatal and non-fatal accidents through outcomes and causes

Safety Science, Volume 71 – Jan 1, 2015

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0925-7535
eISSN
1879-1042
DOI
10.1016/j.ssci.2014.02.009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Occupational accidents are frequent, usually single victim, events. There are statistics on their numbers, such as published by the European Commission (2009) . Amongst occupational accidents fatal accidents are rarer events than the non-fatal ( Hämäläinen et al., 2009 ). Multiple fatality occupational accidents are even rarer and may be referred to as catastrophes e.g. in the US the Occupational Safety and Health Administration describes in-patient hospitalisation of three or more employees as a catastrophe ( US Department of Labour, 2014 ). Major accidents, a term generally associated with process safety and involving fire, explosion or toxic emission ( EU Council, 1996 ), are also rare events and usually result in publically available investigation reports. So, a catastrophe or a major accident is denoted by its significant consequences such as multiple fatalities or the potential for multiple fatalities or an accident which causes significant social unrest. Well known major accident examples are the Union Carbide chemical loss of containment disaster at Bhopal in India in 1984 with 2500 deaths being reported within 5 days or the radioactive release from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion in the Ukraine in 1986 leaving large areas contaminated with radioactive

Journal

Safety ScienceElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2015

References

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