Experimental research on the friction and wear properties of a contact strip of a pantograph–catenary system at the sliding speed of 350km/h with electric current

Experimental research on the friction and wear properties of a contact strip of a... The friction and wear properties of a contact strip in a contact strip rubbing against a contact wire were studied. A series of experimental tests on the vibration between the contact strip and contact wire were conducted on a high-speed block-on-ring tester under the conditions of electric current of 0A and 250A, sliding speed of 200–350km/h and normal loads of 120N. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe morphology of the worn surfaces. Experimental results indicate that the vibration of the contact strip is aggravated with increasing sliding speed. In contrast with those without electric current, the friction coefficient of the strip against the contact wire decreases and the wear rate increases obviously with increasing sliding speed. With the increase of the sliding speed, the contact surface temperature between the strip and contact wire with electric current grows faster. The arc discharge becomes stronger and stronger with the sliding speed, which results in aggravated arc erosion wear on the surface of the strip. Delamination wear and arc erosion wear are two main wear mechanisms for the strip against contact wire with electric current of 250A when the sliding speed is bigger than 250km/h. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wear Elsevier

Experimental research on the friction and wear properties of a contact strip of a pantograph–catenary system at the sliding speed of 350km/h with electric current

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0043-1648
eISSN
1873-2577
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.wear.2014.11.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The friction and wear properties of a contact strip in a contact strip rubbing against a contact wire were studied. A series of experimental tests on the vibration between the contact strip and contact wire were conducted on a high-speed block-on-ring tester under the conditions of electric current of 0A and 250A, sliding speed of 200–350km/h and normal loads of 120N. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe morphology of the worn surfaces. Experimental results indicate that the vibration of the contact strip is aggravated with increasing sliding speed. In contrast with those without electric current, the friction coefficient of the strip against the contact wire decreases and the wear rate increases obviously with increasing sliding speed. With the increase of the sliding speed, the contact surface temperature between the strip and contact wire with electric current grows faster. The arc discharge becomes stronger and stronger with the sliding speed, which results in aggravated arc erosion wear on the surface of the strip. Delamination wear and arc erosion wear are two main wear mechanisms for the strip against contact wire with electric current of 250A when the sliding speed is bigger than 250km/h.

Journal

WearElsevier

Published: May 1, 2015

References

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