Exotic tree plantations and the regeneration of natural forests in Kibale National Park, Uganda

Exotic tree plantations and the regeneration of natural forests in Kibale National Park, Uganda Exotic tree plantations have been considered as a management strategy for the rehabilitation of indigenous tree communities in situations that require human intervention to assure forest ecosystem rehabilitation. This study evaluated the value of pine Pinus caribaea and Pinus patula and cypress Cupressus lusitanica plantations as a means of permitting indigenous trees to become established on derelict land in the Kibale National Park (766 km 2 ) of western Uganda. We present data on the size and density of indigenous trees >2 m tall growing in 80 (10 m × 10 m) quadrats in plantation areas before and after plantation harvest. Species richness for indigenous trees was high in the plantation areas; 47 species of indigenous trees were found in the 0·8 ha sampled, as compared to 78 species in a 5·4 ha area of intact forest. The number of indigenous trees in the quadrats varied from five to 38. There was no significant difference in species richness or density between areas of logged and unlogged P. patula . However, damage resulting from the logging operation was evident and may affect longer term regeneration patterns. Recommendations and cautionary remarks are made with respect to using plantations as a management scheme to rehabilitate indigenous tree communities in derelict areas. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Exotic tree plantations and the regeneration of natural forests in Kibale National Park, Uganda

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
D.O.I.
10.1016/0006-3207(95)00124-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Exotic tree plantations have been considered as a management strategy for the rehabilitation of indigenous tree communities in situations that require human intervention to assure forest ecosystem rehabilitation. This study evaluated the value of pine Pinus caribaea and Pinus patula and cypress Cupressus lusitanica plantations as a means of permitting indigenous trees to become established on derelict land in the Kibale National Park (766 km 2 ) of western Uganda. We present data on the size and density of indigenous trees >2 m tall growing in 80 (10 m × 10 m) quadrats in plantation areas before and after plantation harvest. Species richness for indigenous trees was high in the plantation areas; 47 species of indigenous trees were found in the 0·8 ha sampled, as compared to 78 species in a 5·4 ha area of intact forest. The number of indigenous trees in the quadrats varied from five to 38. There was no significant difference in species richness or density between areas of logged and unlogged P. patula . However, damage resulting from the logging operation was evident and may affect longer term regeneration patterns. Recommendations and cautionary remarks are made with respect to using plantations as a management scheme to rehabilitate indigenous tree communities in derelict areas.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1996

References

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