Exogenous β-amyloid peptide interferes with GLUT4 localization in neurons

Exogenous β-amyloid peptide interferes with GLUT4 localization in neurons Aging represents a major risk factor for numerous illnesses that are of increasing importance to society, including two of the most prevalent: diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Studies have shown that diabetes is a risk factor for spontaneous Alzheimer׳s disease. While these studies suggest that diabetes can contribute to Alzheimer׳s disease, the implications of AD on diabetes are practically unexplored. The major mediator of the pathophysiological effects, the Aβ42 peptide, has been shown to enter neurons and lead to an alteration of the intracellular distribution of the molecular motor myosin Vb. Myosin Vb functions in memory and learning by participating in the strengthening of the long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmissions. It has also been implicated in the translocation of the glucose transporter, GLUT4, to the plasma membrane in response to insulin, a process that is defective in diabetes. Here, the effect on GLUT4 upon entry of the Aβ42 peptide into cultured chick retinal neurons was explored. The results suggest an alteration in distribution and a reduced level at the cell surface, as well as an increased colocalization with myosin Vb, which can partially explain the changes in glucose metabolism associated with AD. It is also shown that the presence of the Aβ40 peptide inhibits the internalization of the Aβ42 peptide in cultured cells. Together, the results provide additional targets for the development of therapeutics against the progression and effects of Alzheimer׳s disease. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Research Elsevier

Exogenous β-amyloid peptide interferes with GLUT4 localization in neurons

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0006-8993
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.brainres.2015.04.026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aging represents a major risk factor for numerous illnesses that are of increasing importance to society, including two of the most prevalent: diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Studies have shown that diabetes is a risk factor for spontaneous Alzheimer׳s disease. While these studies suggest that diabetes can contribute to Alzheimer׳s disease, the implications of AD on diabetes are practically unexplored. The major mediator of the pathophysiological effects, the Aβ42 peptide, has been shown to enter neurons and lead to an alteration of the intracellular distribution of the molecular motor myosin Vb. Myosin Vb functions in memory and learning by participating in the strengthening of the long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmissions. It has also been implicated in the translocation of the glucose transporter, GLUT4, to the plasma membrane in response to insulin, a process that is defective in diabetes. Here, the effect on GLUT4 upon entry of the Aβ42 peptide into cultured chick retinal neurons was explored. The results suggest an alteration in distribution and a reduced level at the cell surface, as well as an increased colocalization with myosin Vb, which can partially explain the changes in glucose metabolism associated with AD. It is also shown that the presence of the Aβ40 peptide inhibits the internalization of the Aβ42 peptide in cultured cells. Together, the results provide additional targets for the development of therapeutics against the progression and effects of Alzheimer׳s disease.

Journal

Brain ResearchElsevier

Published: Jul 30, 2015

References

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