Exercise training is not associated with improved levels of C-reactive protein or adiponectin

Exercise training is not associated with improved levels of C-reactive protein or adiponectin The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of exercise training on the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and adiponectin, and to assess whether exercise-induced changes in insulin resistance could be explained in part by changes in these inflammation markers. Study participants included 51 middle-aged (45.3 ± 8.3 years; mean ± SD), overweight (33.7 ± 4.8 BMI), insulin-resistant, nondiabetic individuals. Subjects had their insulin sensitivity, body fat, CRP, and adiponectin levels measured, and their predicted maximal fitness calculated before and after 16 weeks of moderate, intense, or no exercise training. Modest improvements in fitness, body composition, and insulin sensitivity were observed, but these changes were not associated with decreased CRP or increased adiponectin levels, even when subjects were stratified by their change in fitness or obesity. Regression analysis demonstrated that the change in percentage of body fat was significantly related to changes in insulin sensitivity, whereas changes in VO 2 MAX, CRP, and adiponectin were not. Participation in moderate to intense exercise was not associated with improved measures of chronic inflammation markers, as measured by CRP and adiponectin. Moreover, improvements in insulin sensitivity resulting from exercise or modest weight loss did not appear to be related to changes in these markers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Metabolism Elsevier

Exercise training is not associated with improved levels of C-reactive protein or adiponectin

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/exercise-training-is-not-associated-with-improved-levels-of-c-reactive-6ia9fPcY94
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of exercise training on the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and adiponectin, and to assess whether exercise-induced changes in insulin resistance could be explained in part by changes in these inflammation markers. Study participants included 51 middle-aged (45.3 ± 8.3 years; mean ± SD), overweight (33.7 ± 4.8 BMI), insulin-resistant, nondiabetic individuals. Subjects had their insulin sensitivity, body fat, CRP, and adiponectin levels measured, and their predicted maximal fitness calculated before and after 16 weeks of moderate, intense, or no exercise training. Modest improvements in fitness, body composition, and insulin sensitivity were observed, but these changes were not associated with decreased CRP or increased adiponectin levels, even when subjects were stratified by their change in fitness or obesity. Regression analysis demonstrated that the change in percentage of body fat was significantly related to changes in insulin sensitivity, whereas changes in VO 2 MAX, CRP, and adiponectin were not. Participation in moderate to intense exercise was not associated with improved measures of chronic inflammation markers, as measured by CRP and adiponectin. Moreover, improvements in insulin sensitivity resulting from exercise or modest weight loss did not appear to be related to changes in these markers.

Journal

MetabolismElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2005

References

  • Visceral fat and liver fat are independent predictors of metabolic risk factors in men
    Nguyen-Duy, T.B.; Nichaman, M.Z.; Church, T.S.
  • Evaluation of nine automated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein methods: implications for Clinical and Epidemiological Applications. Part 2
    Roberts, W.L.; Moulton, L.; Law, T.C.
  • Adiponectin is not altered with exercise training despite enhanced insulin action
    Hulver, M.W.; Zheng, D.; Tanner, C.J.
  • Cytokine response to eccentric exercise in young and elderly humans
    Toft, A.D.; Jensen, L.B.; Bruunsgaard, H.
  • Regulation of adiponectin by adipose tissue-derived cytokines: in vivo and in vitro investigations in humans
    Bruun, J.M.; Lihn, A.S.; Verdich, C.
  • Antioxidants attenuate the plasma cytokine response to exercise in humans
    Vassilakopoulos, T.; Karatza, M.H.; Katsaounou, P.
  • Reduction in C-reactive protein through cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training
    MIlani, R.V.; Lavie, C.J.; Mehra, M.R.
  • Effect of physical activity on serum C-reactive protein
    Albert, M.A.; Glynn, R.J.; Ridker, P.M.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off