Excitatory amino acid transporters: keeping up with glutamate

Excitatory amino acid transporters: keeping up with glutamate Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are the primary regulators of extracellular glutamate concentrations in the central nervous system. Among the five known human EAAT subtypes, the glial carriers, EAAT1 and EAAT2 have the greatest impact on clearance of glutamate released during neurotransmission. Studies of carriers expressed on neurons, Purkinje cells and photoreceptor cells (EAAT3, EAAT4 and EAAT5, respectively) suggest more subtle roles for these subtypes in regulating excitability and signalling. The data suggest that EAA transporters may influence glutamatergic transmission by regulating the amount of glutamate available to activate pre- and post-synaptic metabotropic receptors and by altering neuronal excitability through a transporter-associated anion conductance that is activated by carrier substrates. Recent studies on structural, mechanistic and physiological aspects of carrier function in a variety of model systems and organisms have led to surprising insights into how excitatory amino acid transporters shape cellular communication in the nervous system. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurochemistry International Elsevier

Excitatory amino acid transporters: keeping up with glutamate

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/excitatory-amino-acid-transporters-keeping-up-with-glutamate-sACP9Sy3SZ
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0197-0186
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0197-0186(02)00018-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are the primary regulators of extracellular glutamate concentrations in the central nervous system. Among the five known human EAAT subtypes, the glial carriers, EAAT1 and EAAT2 have the greatest impact on clearance of glutamate released during neurotransmission. Studies of carriers expressed on neurons, Purkinje cells and photoreceptor cells (EAAT3, EAAT4 and EAAT5, respectively) suggest more subtle roles for these subtypes in regulating excitability and signalling. The data suggest that EAA transporters may influence glutamatergic transmission by regulating the amount of glutamate available to activate pre- and post-synaptic metabotropic receptors and by altering neuronal excitability through a transporter-associated anion conductance that is activated by carrier substrates. Recent studies on structural, mechanistic and physiological aspects of carrier function in a variety of model systems and organisms have led to surprising insights into how excitatory amino acid transporters shape cellular communication in the nervous system.

Journal

Neurochemistry InternationalElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2002

References

  • Astrocyte glutamate transport: review of properties, regulation, and physiological functions
    Anderson, C.M.; Swanson, R.A.
  • Differential perturbation of neuronal and glial glutamate transport systems in retinal ischaemia
    Barnett, N.L.; Pow, D.V.; Bull, N.D.
  • Glutamate transporter EAAC-1-deficient mice develop dicarboxylic aminoaciduria and behavioral abnormalities but no neurodegeneration
    Peghini, P.; Janzen, J.; Stoffel, W.
  • Glutamate-gated chloride channel with glutamate-transporter-like properties in cone photoreceptors of the tiger salamander
    Picaud, S.A.; Larsson, H.P.; Grant, G.B.; Lecar, H.; Werblin, F.S.
  • Developmental expression of excitatory amino acid transporter 5: a photoreceptor and bipolar cell glutamate transporter in rat retina
    Pow, D.V.; Barnett, N.L.
  • High-affinity glutamate transporters in the rat retina: a major role of the glial glutamate transporter GLAST-1 in transmitter clearance
    Rauen, T.; Taylor, W.R.; Kuhlbrodt, K.; Wiessner, M.
  • Excitatory amino acid transporters: a family in flux
    Seal, R.P.; Amara, S.G.
  • Localization of the high-affinity glutamate transporter EAAC1 in rat kidney
    Shayakul, C.; Kanai, Y.; Lee, W.S.; Brown, D.; Rothstein, J.D.; Hediger, M.A.
  • Motor discoordination and increased susceptibility to cerebellar injury in GLAST mutant mice
    Watase, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Kano, M.; Yamada, K.; Watanabe, M.; Inoue, Y.; Okuyama, S.; Sakagawa, T.; Ogawa, S.; Kawashima, N.; Hori, S.; Takimoto, M.; Wada, K.; Tanaka, K.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off