Evolutionary systems biology: links between gene evolution and function

Evolutionary systems biology: links between gene evolution and function The recent accumulation of genome-wide data on various facets of gene expression, function and evolution stimulated the emergence of a new field, evolutionary systems biology. Many significant correlations were detected between variables that characterize the functioning of a gene, such as expression level, knockout effect, connectivity of genetic and protein–protein interaction networks, and variables that describe gene evolution, such as sequence evolution rate and propensity for gene loss. The first attempts on multidimensional analysis of genomic data yielded composite variables that describe the ‘status’ of a gene in the genomic community. However, it remains uncertain whether different functional variables affect gene evolution synergistically or there is a single, dominant factor. The number of translation events, linked to selection for translational robustness, was proposed as a candidate for such a major determinant of protein evolution. These developments show that, although the methodological basis of evolutionary systems biology is not yet fully solidified, this area of research is already starting to yield fundamental biological insights. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Biotechnology Elsevier

Evolutionary systems biology: links between gene evolution and function

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0958-1669
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.copbio.2006.08.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The recent accumulation of genome-wide data on various facets of gene expression, function and evolution stimulated the emergence of a new field, evolutionary systems biology. Many significant correlations were detected between variables that characterize the functioning of a gene, such as expression level, knockout effect, connectivity of genetic and protein–protein interaction networks, and variables that describe gene evolution, such as sequence evolution rate and propensity for gene loss. The first attempts on multidimensional analysis of genomic data yielded composite variables that describe the ‘status’ of a gene in the genomic community. However, it remains uncertain whether different functional variables affect gene evolution synergistically or there is a single, dominant factor. The number of translation events, linked to selection for translational robustness, was proposed as a candidate for such a major determinant of protein evolution. These developments show that, although the methodological basis of evolutionary systems biology is not yet fully solidified, this area of research is already starting to yield fundamental biological insights.

Journal

Current Opinion in BiotechnologyElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2006

References

  • Back to the biology in systems biology: what can we learn from biomolecular networks?
    Huang, S.
  • The evolution of molecular genetic pathways and networks
    Cork, J.M.; Purugganan, M.D.
  • From phenotype to genotype
    Streelman, J.T.; Kocher, T.D.
  • Converging on a general model of protein evolution
    Herbeck, J.T.; Wall, D.P.
  • Highly expressed genes in yeast evolve slowly
    Pal, C.; Papp, B.; Hurst, L.D.
  • Biochemical evolution
    Wilson, A.C.; Carlson, S.S.; White, T.J.
  • Do essential genes evolve slowly?
    Hurst, L.D.; Smith, N.G.
  • Translational selection and yeast proteome evolution
    Akashi, H.
  • Synonymous codon usage in Drosophila melanogaster : natural selection and translational accuracy
    Akashi, H.
  • Population genetics of translational robustness
    Wilke, C.O.; Drummond, D.A.

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