Evaluation of waste biomasses and their biochars for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Evaluation of waste biomasses and their biochars for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons This work evaluates the use of biomasses and their biochars as adsorbents to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water. Coconut waste (CW) and orange waste (OW) were pyrolyzed at 350 °C to produce the corresponding biochars (BCW and BOW). Adsorption tests using a mixed solution of benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene showed removal percentages of 30.33–83.43% (CW), 47.09–83.02% (BCW), 24.20–74.25% (OW), and 23.84–84.02% (BOW). The adsorption mechanisms appeared to involve π-π interactions of similar groups of the adsorbate and adsorbent, together with hydrophobic effects. There was no indication of competition between the PAHs for the adsorption sites, and there was evidence of cooperative adsorption. The PAHs could be desorbed from the adsorbents with efficiencies in the range 34.88–72.32%, and the reuse of the adsorbents in two further cycles demonstrated their potential for use in the removal of PAHs from water. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Environmental Management Elsevier

Evaluation of waste biomasses and their biochars for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-4797
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.05.084
Publisher site
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Abstract

This work evaluates the use of biomasses and their biochars as adsorbents to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water. Coconut waste (CW) and orange waste (OW) were pyrolyzed at 350 °C to produce the corresponding biochars (BCW and BOW). Adsorption tests using a mixed solution of benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene showed removal percentages of 30.33–83.43% (CW), 47.09–83.02% (BCW), 24.20–74.25% (OW), and 23.84–84.02% (BOW). The adsorption mechanisms appeared to involve π-π interactions of similar groups of the adsorbate and adsorbent, together with hydrophobic effects. There was no indication of competition between the PAHs for the adsorption sites, and there was evidence of cooperative adsorption. The PAHs could be desorbed from the adsorbents with efficiencies in the range 34.88–72.32%, and the reuse of the adsorbents in two further cycles demonstrated their potential for use in the removal of PAHs from water.

Journal

Journal of Environmental ManagementElsevier

Published: Sep 15, 2017

References

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