Evaluating the potential for energy savings on lighting by integrating fibre optics in buildings

Evaluating the potential for energy savings on lighting by integrating fibre optics in buildings The effective integration of an artificial lighting system and daylight in buildings occurs only when the artificial lighting system can be switched on or off as a function of daylight levels reaching the working surface of spaces. The paper considers fibre optics technology as a means of supplementing the daylight received at the rear of rooms and the subsequent integration of the total daylight received with a controlled artificial lighting system. Such an approach would contribute not only to energy savings but also to a reduction in environmental pollution. The evaluation took place using the climatic data from seven cities in Brazil and one in the UK. Results showed that by effectively integrating daylight from windows in buildings with the artificial lighting system, energy savings ranging from 17.7% to 92.0% could be achieved in the seven cities in Brazil and savings ranging from 10.8% to 44.0% could be achieved in the UK. By incorporating fibre optic technology into the system, the potential for energy savings on lighting was then found to range from 8.0% to 82.3% for the cities in Brazil and from 56.0% to 89.2% in the UK. For the city in the UK, it was further shown that there would be a reduction in carbon dioxide emission of 122 kg/m 2 of built area per year if daylight from windows were integrated with the artificial lighting system, and that this would increase to 138 kg/m 2 per year if fibre optics technology were to be installed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Building and Environment Elsevier

Evaluating the potential for energy savings on lighting by integrating fibre optics in buildings

Building and Environment, Volume 41 (12) – Dec 1, 2006

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0360-1323
DOI
10.1016/j.buildenv.2005.06.013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The effective integration of an artificial lighting system and daylight in buildings occurs only when the artificial lighting system can be switched on or off as a function of daylight levels reaching the working surface of spaces. The paper considers fibre optics technology as a means of supplementing the daylight received at the rear of rooms and the subsequent integration of the total daylight received with a controlled artificial lighting system. Such an approach would contribute not only to energy savings but also to a reduction in environmental pollution. The evaluation took place using the climatic data from seven cities in Brazil and one in the UK. Results showed that by effectively integrating daylight from windows in buildings with the artificial lighting system, energy savings ranging from 17.7% to 92.0% could be achieved in the seven cities in Brazil and savings ranging from 10.8% to 44.0% could be achieved in the UK. By incorporating fibre optic technology into the system, the potential for energy savings on lighting was then found to range from 8.0% to 82.3% for the cities in Brazil and from 56.0% to 89.2% in the UK. For the city in the UK, it was further shown that there would be a reduction in carbon dioxide emission of 122 kg/m 2 of built area per year if daylight from windows were integrated with the artificial lighting system, and that this would increase to 138 kg/m 2 per year if fibre optics technology were to be installed.

Journal

Building and EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2006

References

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