Estrogen signaling in the medial amygdala decreases emotional stress responses and obesity in ovariectomized rats

Estrogen signaling in the medial amygdala decreases emotional stress responses and obesity in... Declining estradiol (E2), as occurs during menopause, increases risk for obesity and psychopathology (i.e., depression, anxiety). E2 modulates mood and energy homeostasis via binding to estrogen receptors (ER) in the brain. The often comorbid and bidirectional relationship between mood and metabolic disorders suggests shared hormonal and/or brain networks. The medial amygdala (MeA) is abundant in ERs and regulates mood, endocrine, and metabolic stress responses; therefore we tested the hypothesis that E2 in the MeA mitigates emotional and metabolic dysfunction in a rodent model of surgical menopause. Adult female rats were ovariectomized (OVX) and received bilateral implants of E2 or cholesterol micropellets aimed at the MeA. E2-MeA decreased anxiety-like (center entries, center time) and depression-like (immobility) behaviors in the open field and forced swim tests (FST), respectively in ovariectomized rats. E2-MeA also prevented hyperphagia, body weight gain, increased visceral adiposity, and glucose intolerance in ovariectomized rats. E2-MeA decreased caloric efficiency, suggestive of increased energy expenditure. E2-MeA also modulated c-Fos neural activity in amygdalar (central and medial) and hypothalamic (paraventricular and arcuate) brain regions that regulate mood and energy homeostasis in response to the FST, a physically demanding task. Given the shared neural circuitry between mood and body weight regulation, c-Fos expression in discrete brain regions in response to the FST may be due to the psychologically stressful and/or metabolic demands of the task. Together, these findings suggest that the MeA is a critical node for mediating estrogenic effects on mood and energy homeostasis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hormones and Behavior Elsevier

Estrogen signaling in the medial amygdala decreases emotional stress responses and obesity in ovariectomized rats

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/estrogen-signaling-in-the-medial-amygdala-decreases-emotional-stress-9h6X5Br3LX
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0018-506X
eISSN
1095-6867
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.yhbeh.2017.12.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Declining estradiol (E2), as occurs during menopause, increases risk for obesity and psychopathology (i.e., depression, anxiety). E2 modulates mood and energy homeostasis via binding to estrogen receptors (ER) in the brain. The often comorbid and bidirectional relationship between mood and metabolic disorders suggests shared hormonal and/or brain networks. The medial amygdala (MeA) is abundant in ERs and regulates mood, endocrine, and metabolic stress responses; therefore we tested the hypothesis that E2 in the MeA mitigates emotional and metabolic dysfunction in a rodent model of surgical menopause. Adult female rats were ovariectomized (OVX) and received bilateral implants of E2 or cholesterol micropellets aimed at the MeA. E2-MeA decreased anxiety-like (center entries, center time) and depression-like (immobility) behaviors in the open field and forced swim tests (FST), respectively in ovariectomized rats. E2-MeA also prevented hyperphagia, body weight gain, increased visceral adiposity, and glucose intolerance in ovariectomized rats. E2-MeA decreased caloric efficiency, suggestive of increased energy expenditure. E2-MeA also modulated c-Fos neural activity in amygdalar (central and medial) and hypothalamic (paraventricular and arcuate) brain regions that regulate mood and energy homeostasis in response to the FST, a physically demanding task. Given the shared neural circuitry between mood and body weight regulation, c-Fos expression in discrete brain regions in response to the FST may be due to the psychologically stressful and/or metabolic demands of the task. Together, these findings suggest that the MeA is a critical node for mediating estrogenic effects on mood and energy homeostasis.

Journal

Hormones and BehaviorElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off