Estimating willingness-to-pay and financial feasibility in small water projects in El Salvador

Estimating willingness-to-pay and financial feasibility in small water projects in El Salvador The study here uses a non-market evaluation technique – the contingent valuation method – to estimate the economic value that people in four semi-rural communities in El Salvador place on improved water quality and sanitation. The findings suggest that access to potable water and sanitation was a high priority for people living in those communities. In addition, their high willingness-to-pay for these improved services supports the argument that medium-sized water supply projects in El Salvador could be profitable from the private perspective. The concept of maximum willingness-to-pay, well understood, can help policy makers in setting water charges in developing economies. This study shows that designing financially feasible projects that have a positive impact on the social conditions in poor communities is possible. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Business Research Elsevier

Estimating willingness-to-pay and financial feasibility in small water projects in El Salvador

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0148-2963
eISSN
1873-7978
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jbusres.2013.01.014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The study here uses a non-market evaluation technique – the contingent valuation method – to estimate the economic value that people in four semi-rural communities in El Salvador place on improved water quality and sanitation. The findings suggest that access to potable water and sanitation was a high priority for people living in those communities. In addition, their high willingness-to-pay for these improved services supports the argument that medium-sized water supply projects in El Salvador could be profitable from the private perspective. The concept of maximum willingness-to-pay, well understood, can help policy makers in setting water charges in developing economies. This study shows that designing financially feasible projects that have a positive impact on the social conditions in poor communities is possible.

Journal

Journal of Business ResearchElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2013

References

  • Sustainability of potable water services in the Philippines
    Bohm, R.; Fox, W.; Essenberg, T.
  • The value of clean water: The public's willingness-to-pay for boatable, fishable, and swimmable quality water
    Carson, R.T.; Mitchell, R.C.
  • Rural water supply in Kerala, India: How to emerge from a low-level equilibrium trap
    Singh, B.; Ramasubban, R.; Bhatia, R.; Briscoe, J.

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