ERP effects and perceived exclusion in the Cyberball paradigm: Correlates of expectancy violation?

ERP effects and perceived exclusion in the Cyberball paradigm: Correlates of expectancy violation? A virtual ball-tossing game called Cyberball has allowed the identification of neural structures involved in the processing of social exclusion by using neurocognitive methods. However, there is still an ongoing debate if structures involved are either pain- or exclusion-specific or part of a broader network. In electrophysiological Cyberball studies we have shown that the P3b component is sensitive to exclusion manipulations, possibly modulated by the probability of ball possession of the participant (event “self”) or the presumed co-players (event “other”). Since it is known from oddball studies that the P3b is not only modulated by the objective probability of an event, but also by subjective expectancy, we independently manipulated the probability of the events “self” and “other” and the expectancy for these events. Questionnaire data indicate that social need threat is only induced when the expectancy for involvement in the ball-tossing game is violated. Similarly, the P3b amplitude of both “self” and “other” events was a correlate of expectancy violation. We conclude that both the subjective report of exclusion and the P3b effect induced in the Cyberball paradigm are primarily based on a cognitive process sensitive to expectancy violations, and that the P3b is not related to the activation of an exclusion-specific neural alarm system. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Research Elsevier

ERP effects and perceived exclusion in the Cyberball paradigm: Correlates of expectancy violation?

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0006-8993
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.brainres.2015.07.038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A virtual ball-tossing game called Cyberball has allowed the identification of neural structures involved in the processing of social exclusion by using neurocognitive methods. However, there is still an ongoing debate if structures involved are either pain- or exclusion-specific or part of a broader network. In electrophysiological Cyberball studies we have shown that the P3b component is sensitive to exclusion manipulations, possibly modulated by the probability of ball possession of the participant (event “self”) or the presumed co-players (event “other”). Since it is known from oddball studies that the P3b is not only modulated by the objective probability of an event, but also by subjective expectancy, we independently manipulated the probability of the events “self” and “other” and the expectancy for these events. Questionnaire data indicate that social need threat is only induced when the expectancy for involvement in the ball-tossing game is violated. Similarly, the P3b amplitude of both “self” and “other” events was a correlate of expectancy violation. We conclude that both the subjective report of exclusion and the P3b effect induced in the Cyberball paradigm are primarily based on a cognitive process sensitive to expectancy violations, and that the P3b is not related to the activation of an exclusion-specific neural alarm system.

Journal

Brain ResearchElsevier

Published: Oct 22, 2015

References

  • Development of neural systems for processing social exclusion from childhood to adolescence
    Bolling, D.Z.; Pitskel, N.B.; Deen, B.; Crowley, M.J.; Mayes, L.C.; Pelphrey, K.A.
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    Marks, D.F.
  • Social exclusion and punishment of excluders: neural correlates and developmental trajectories
    Moor, B.G.; Guroglu, B.; Op de Macks, Z.A.; Rombouts, S.A.; Van der Molen, M.W.; Crone, E.A.
  • P300 and response selection: a new look using independent-components analysis
    Pritchard, W.S.; Houlihan, M.E.; Robinson, J.H.
  • Differential effects of the stimulus sequence on CNV and P300
    Stadler, W.; Klimesch, W.; Pouthas, V.; Ragot, R.
  • An event-related examination of neural activity during social interactions
    Themanson, J.R.; Khatcherian, S.M.; Ball, A.B.; Rosen, P.J.
  • Play it again: neural responses to reunion with excluders predicted by attachment patterns
    White, L.O.; Wu, J.; Borelli, J.L.; Mayes, L.C.; Crowley, M.J.

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