Equivalent dose estimation using a single aliquot of polymineral fine grains

Equivalent dose estimation using a single aliquot of polymineral fine grains We have tested the suitability of a new single-aliquot regenerative-dose protocol for estimating the equivalent dose ( D e ) in polymineral fine grains extracted from colluvia from various sites in Germany. First, we report the behaviour of three OSL signals: (i) blue-stimulated, (ii) infrared-stimulated luminescence, and (iii) blue-stimulated luminescence following infrared (IR) stimulation, using a near-UV (290–380 nm) detection window in each case. For these three signals, there is a significant change in sensitivity with regeneration cycle; this change can be compensated for using the response to a fixed test dose after each natural or regenerated measurement. The source of the three luminescence signals is then investigated using pulse-anneal and elevated-temperature experiments. Fading tests on laboratory-induced signals show that although the IR signals fade by up to 23% in 15 days at 100°C, the post-IR blue signals are stable. The preheat dependence of estimates of D e obtained using fine grains is presented for the first time, for both blue- and IR-derived signals. Our results are compared with D e estimates derived from multiple-aliquot additive-dose IR luminescence data, obtained using a blue detection window, and also with expected values of D e based on independent age estimates and measured dose rates. We conclude that post-IR blue-stimulated luminescence provides reliable estimates of D e , and that these are probably superior to the IRSL estimates obtained using both near-UV and blue detection windows. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Radiation Measurements Elsevier

Equivalent dose estimation using a single aliquot of polymineral fine grains

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
1350-4487
D.O.I.
10.1016/S1350-4487(00)00101-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We have tested the suitability of a new single-aliquot regenerative-dose protocol for estimating the equivalent dose ( D e ) in polymineral fine grains extracted from colluvia from various sites in Germany. First, we report the behaviour of three OSL signals: (i) blue-stimulated, (ii) infrared-stimulated luminescence, and (iii) blue-stimulated luminescence following infrared (IR) stimulation, using a near-UV (290–380 nm) detection window in each case. For these three signals, there is a significant change in sensitivity with regeneration cycle; this change can be compensated for using the response to a fixed test dose after each natural or regenerated measurement. The source of the three luminescence signals is then investigated using pulse-anneal and elevated-temperature experiments. Fading tests on laboratory-induced signals show that although the IR signals fade by up to 23% in 15 days at 100°C, the post-IR blue signals are stable. The preheat dependence of estimates of D e obtained using fine grains is presented for the first time, for both blue- and IR-derived signals. Our results are compared with D e estimates derived from multiple-aliquot additive-dose IR luminescence data, obtained using a blue detection window, and also with expected values of D e based on independent age estimates and measured dose rates. We conclude that post-IR blue-stimulated luminescence provides reliable estimates of D e , and that these are probably superior to the IRSL estimates obtained using both near-UV and blue detection windows.

Journal

Radiation MeasurementsElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2001

References

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