Equine Metabolic Syndrome: A Complex Disease Influenced by Genetics and the Environment

Equine Metabolic Syndrome: A Complex Disease Influenced by Genetics and the Environment 1 Introduction</h5> Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) refers to a cluster of clinical abnormalities associated with an increased risk of laminitis [1,2] . In 2002, Johnson [1] recognized that primary features of a laminitis-prone phenotype (i.e., obesity, insulin resistance) were analogous to those described for the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in humans which is a constellation of abnormalities, including obesity, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, and hypertension, associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and perhaps also type 2 diabetes mellitus [3–5] . Work by a number of authors has documented similarities between EMS and MetS ( Table 1 ). In 2010, the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine large animal consensus statement [2] listed several criteria for EMS based on available research data. The three main criteria included: documented or suspected insulin resistance (IR), that is hyperinsulinemia and/or abnormal glycemic and insulinemic responses to oral or IV glucose or insulin challenges; generalized obesity and/or increased adiposity in specific locations (regional adiposity) including the nuchal ligament (“cresty neck”), the tailhead, behind the shoulder, in the prepuce or mammary gland region; and predisposition toward laminitis that develops in the absence of other recognized causes, such as grain overload, retained placenta, colitis, colic or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Elsevier

Equine Metabolic Syndrome: A Complex Disease Influenced by Genetics and the Environment

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0737-0806
eISSN
1542-7412
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jevs.2015.03.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) refers to a cluster of clinical abnormalities associated with an increased risk of laminitis [1,2] . In 2002, Johnson [1] recognized that primary features of a laminitis-prone phenotype (i.e., obesity, insulin resistance) were analogous to those described for the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in humans which is a constellation of abnormalities, including obesity, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, and hypertension, associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and perhaps also type 2 diabetes mellitus [3–5] . Work by a number of authors has documented similarities between EMS and MetS ( Table 1 ). In 2010, the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine large animal consensus statement [2] listed several criteria for EMS based on available research data. The three main criteria included: documented or suspected insulin resistance (IR), that is hyperinsulinemia and/or abnormal glycemic and insulinemic responses to oral or IV glucose or insulin challenges; generalized obesity and/or increased adiposity in specific locations (regional adiposity) including the nuchal ligament (“cresty neck”), the tailhead, behind the shoulder, in the prepuce or mammary gland region; and predisposition toward laminitis that develops in the absence of other recognized causes, such as grain overload, retained placenta, colitis, colic or

Journal

Journal of Equine Veterinary ScienceElsevier

Published: May 1, 2015

References

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