Enhanced ultrasonically assisted turning of a β-titanium alloy

Enhanced ultrasonically assisted turning of a β-titanium alloy 1 Introduction</h5> Machining of titanium alloys has been identified as one of the most important manufacturing processes since broad adoption of these alloys in aerospace, automotive, chemical and biomedical industries [1] . Titanium alloys have excellent mechanical properties such as high hot hardness, a good strength-to-weight ratio and high corrosion resistance. It is also well known that β-titanium alloys offer higher tensile strengths due to their enhanced inherent hardness, with increased fatigue strength and better forming properties in comparison to near-α- or α + β-titanium alloys. However, poor thermal conductivity and high chemical affinity of these alloys to traditional tool materials severely impair their machinability [2] . It has been reported that β-titanium alloys are among the most difficult to machine titanium alloys [3] .</P>Machining processes of titanium alloys are typically characterised by low cutting feeds and speeds, typically in the range of 12–38 m/min for aged alloys [4] . This increases machining costs, especially for many aircraft components where 90% of the material often needs to be removed in order to achieve a final shape. Needless to say, the cost of machined titanium components could be substantially reduced by improving material removal rates (MRR). Additionally, high friction http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ultrasonics Elsevier

Enhanced ultrasonically assisted turning of a β-titanium alloy

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0041-624X
eISSN
1874-9968
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ultras.2013.03.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Machining of titanium alloys has been identified as one of the most important manufacturing processes since broad adoption of these alloys in aerospace, automotive, chemical and biomedical industries [1] . Titanium alloys have excellent mechanical properties such as high hot hardness, a good strength-to-weight ratio and high corrosion resistance. It is also well known that β-titanium alloys offer higher tensile strengths due to their enhanced inherent hardness, with increased fatigue strength and better forming properties in comparison to near-α- or α + β-titanium alloys. However, poor thermal conductivity and high chemical affinity of these alloys to traditional tool materials severely impair their machinability [2] . It has been reported that β-titanium alloys are among the most difficult to machine titanium alloys [3] .</P>Machining processes of titanium alloys are typically characterised by low cutting feeds and speeds, typically in the range of 12–38 m/min for aged alloys [4] . This increases machining costs, especially for many aircraft components where 90% of the material often needs to be removed in order to achieve a final shape. Needless to say, the cost of machined titanium components could be substantially reduced by improving material removal rates (MRR). Additionally, high friction

Journal

UltrasonicsElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2013

References

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