Enhanced multi-metal extraction with EDDS of deficient and excess dosages under the influence of dissolved and soil organic matter

Enhanced multi-metal extraction with EDDS of deficient and excess dosages under the influence of... This study investigated the influence of dissolved and soil organic matter on metal extraction from an artificially contaminated soil. With high concentration of DOM, the extraction of Cu, Zn and Pb was enhanced by forming additional metalEDDS complexes under EDDS deficiency. However, the enhancement of metal extraction under EDDS excess was probably due to the soil structure being disrupted owing to humic acid enhanced Al and Fe dissolution, which induced more metals dissolving from the soils. Fulvic acid was found to enhance metal extraction to a greater extent compared with humic acid because of its high content of the carboxylic functional group. Cu extraction from the soil with high organic matter content using EDDS was the lowest due to the high binding affinity of Cu to SOM, whereas Zn extraction became the highest because of a preference for EDDS to extract Zn due to the high stability constant of ZnEDDS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Enhanced multi-metal extraction with EDDS of deficient and excess dosages under the influence of dissolved and soil organic matter

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2010.09.021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigated the influence of dissolved and soil organic matter on metal extraction from an artificially contaminated soil. With high concentration of DOM, the extraction of Cu, Zn and Pb was enhanced by forming additional metalEDDS complexes under EDDS deficiency. However, the enhancement of metal extraction under EDDS excess was probably due to the soil structure being disrupted owing to humic acid enhanced Al and Fe dissolution, which induced more metals dissolving from the soils. Fulvic acid was found to enhance metal extraction to a greater extent compared with humic acid because of its high content of the carboxylic functional group. Cu extraction from the soil with high organic matter content using EDDS was the lowest due to the high binding affinity of Cu to SOM, whereas Zn extraction became the highest because of a preference for EDDS to extract Zn due to the high stability constant of ZnEDDS.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2011

References

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