Energy balance and cold adaptation in the octopus Pareledone charcoti

Energy balance and cold adaptation in the octopus Pareledone charcoti A complete energy balance equation is calculated for the Antarctic octopus Pareledone charcoti at 0°C. Energy used in respiration, growth, and excretion of nitrogenous and faecal waste, was recorded along with the total consumption of energy through food, for three specimens of P. charcoti (live weights: 73, 51 and 29 g). Growth rates were very slow for cephalopods, with a mean daily increase in body weight of only 0.11%. Assimilation efficiencies were high, between 95.4 and 97.0%, which is consistent with previous work on octopods. The respiration rate in P. charcoti was low, with a mean of 2.45 mg O 2 h −1 for a standard animal of 150 g wet mass at 0°C. In the North Sea octopus Eledone cirrhosa , respiration rates of 9.79 mg O 2 h −1 at 11.5°C and 4.47 mg O 2 h −1 at 4.5°C for a standard animal of 150 g wet mass were recorded. Respiration rates between P. charcoti and E. cirrhosa were compared using a combined Q 10 value between P. charcoti at 0°C and E. cirrhosa at 4.5°C. This suggests that P. charcoti are respiring at a level predicted by E. cirrhosa rates at 4.5 and 11.5°C extrapolated to 0°C along the curve Q 10 =3, with no evidence of metabolic compensation for low temperature. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Elsevier

Energy balance and cold adaptation in the octopus Pareledone charcoti

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0022-0981
eISSN
1879-1697
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0022-0981(99)00161-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A complete energy balance equation is calculated for the Antarctic octopus Pareledone charcoti at 0°C. Energy used in respiration, growth, and excretion of nitrogenous and faecal waste, was recorded along with the total consumption of energy through food, for three specimens of P. charcoti (live weights: 73, 51 and 29 g). Growth rates were very slow for cephalopods, with a mean daily increase in body weight of only 0.11%. Assimilation efficiencies were high, between 95.4 and 97.0%, which is consistent with previous work on octopods. The respiration rate in P. charcoti was low, with a mean of 2.45 mg O 2 h −1 for a standard animal of 150 g wet mass at 0°C. In the North Sea octopus Eledone cirrhosa , respiration rates of 9.79 mg O 2 h −1 at 11.5°C and 4.47 mg O 2 h −1 at 4.5°C for a standard animal of 150 g wet mass were recorded. Respiration rates between P. charcoti and E. cirrhosa were compared using a combined Q 10 value between P. charcoti at 0°C and E. cirrhosa at 4.5°C. This suggests that P. charcoti are respiring at a level predicted by E. cirrhosa rates at 4.5 and 11.5°C extrapolated to 0°C along the curve Q 10 =3, with no evidence of metabolic compensation for low temperature.

Journal

Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and EcologyElsevier

Published: Mar 15, 2000

References

  • Seasonal and annual growth in erect species of Antarctic bryozoans
    Barnes, D.K.A
  • Ammonia excretion during feeding and starvation in Octopus vulgaris
    Boucher-Rodoni, R; Mangold, K
  • Cold adaptation
    Clarke, A
  • Larval development in the Antarctic nemertean Parborlasia corrugatus (Heteronemertea, Lineidae)
    Peck, L.S
  • Pelagic larval development in the brooding Antarctic brachiopod Liothyrella uva
    Peck, L.S; Robinson, K
  • Some relationships between growth, metabolism and food in the mussel Mytilus edulis
    Thompson, R.J; Bayne, B.L

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